Category: Foraging course

Forage Harvest feast – August

This weekend we held one of the last Forage Harvest Feast fynbos forages of the season with amazing people, beautiful weather and delicious food.

Reconnecting with our food and gaining knowledge about our edible Indigenous landscape evoked interesting conversation that flowed around the like minded crowd.

Coleonema oatcakes and Salvia goats cheese

Coleonema “confetti bush” oatcakes and Salvia goats cheese

Buchu brandy

Buchu brandy

The forage classrooms table

The forage classroom.

Forage Harvest Feast

Washing and sorting the forage and harvested goods.

Edible flowers

Edible flower power.

Forage and Harvest course

Sorting the harvest.

Reconnecting to your food

Slow Food – the sweet life.

Wild herb cheeses

Wild herb cheeses

CWild food community meals

Making rainbow salads.

Wild garlic rolls

Wild garlic rolls.

Cooking lunch at Forage Harvest Feast

Cooking up a storm.

Wild food Feast

Feast!

Honeybush and lemon Pelargonium cupcakes

Honeybush and lemon Pelargonium cupcakes.

If you would like to join us on our last Forage Harvest Feast of the season, or bring your kids to join our Kids Forage and Harvest mornings, contact us soon as spaces are filling up quickly.

Forage Harvest Feast

September the 13th – Saturday from 10am-2pm

Kids Forage and Harvest mornings

Saturday 27th of September 10am – 12pm PIZZA
Monday  29th of September 2pm – 4pm PIZZA
Thursday 2nd of October 2pm – 4pm SCONES
Saturday 4th of October 10am – 12pm SCONES

For more info and to book please email roushanna@hotmail.com

 

Forage Harvest Feast

A few weeks ago we had our first Forage Harvest Feast of the season.

It was cold, wet and delicious.

We had a very interesting crowd, including the talented Kate Higgs, who joined us with her magic photography skills.

Here is a little bit of what we got up to…

Peppermint PelargoniumPelargonium tomentosum

Foraging toolsTools

Urban hunter gathererThe Urban Hunter Gatherer digging up some wild garlic – Tulbaghia violacea.

Medicinal Indigeous plantsDescribing medicinal uses for sour fig – Carpobrotus edulis.

VeldkoolVeldkool season – Trachyandra.

Forage Harvest Feast

A sensory experience.

City of EdenAnna Shevel of The City of Eden with her basket of goods.

Wild foodGood Hope honey and raw wild berry jam

Organic vegOrganic veg.

Foaging course Cape TownWashing and chatting.

Foraged ingredientsA foraged herb basket.

Table Bay Hotel chefsChefs from the Table Bay Hotel having fun and chopping up a storm

Wild greens pestoThe Pesto Queen

Forage Harvest FeastFrom bush to table…

Centre for Optimal HealthFeast!

Pelargonium and HoneybushcupcakesPelargonium and Honeybush cupcakes.

Fynbos Foraging courseIf you would like to join us for a Forage Harvest Feast, here are the upcoming course dates:

Saturday the 16th of August, 10am – 2pm FULLY BOOKED

Saturday the 30th of August, 10am – 2pm

Saturday the 4th of October, 10am – 2pm

To book or for more info email roushanna@hotmail.com

 

Hashtag farmlife

Winter is alive.

The squelch of mud under your gumboots, the soft touch of rain on your face, the warmth of a fire in the evening. Dams filling up, rivers flowing, crisp winter greens.Bright copper kettles with warm woolen mittens. You get the idea.

Have you ever seen a sheep shake off rain like a dog does? Its brilliant. The sheep-shake is the new essence of winter for me. That and spinning wool by the fire. The smell of lanolin as I peddle barefoot. 2000 and what did you say?

We might be hippies but we like to think we are hip. We know about things like hashtags and pinterest and instagram.

Here are some photos of #farmlife #capepoint #goodhopegardens

Bee collecting pollen on an AloeBusy bee collecting pollen from an Aloe flower.

PeasWinter peas

Angulare tortoiseAngulare tortoise enjoying a little bit of sunshine.

Baboons ate the carrotsRaided by the baboons

PigsFeeding raided carrot tops to the pigs.

Happy carrotsBut not all of them were eaten. Happiness.

SheepShepherdesses

GoatThis goat. Always reaching for those goals.

Chilli seedsSeed saving – Chilli’s.

And of course, winter brings weeds. Weeds, weeds, weeds.

They have popped up all over our gardens, jostling for position in-between our flowers and veg. There is a cute saying that goes

Weeds – If you cant beat them, eat them.

Many weeds are edible, but you must be able to identify them correctly before attempting any wild weedy snacks as there are also many poisonous ones out there. Two good ones to start with would be Marog or Imfino – our local Lambsquarters and family of the Amaranth, and of course Urtica dioica the stinging Nettle.

Wild greens - marogo and nettle

Nettles are a mega nutrient high superfood. Its best to wear gloves when picking them and if you put them in a bowl and pour hot water over them, the stinging properties go away, leaving you to handle them freely. Marog comes in many different varieties, ranging from red through to dark green. You get a small grained, big leafed variety whose leaves you can use like spinach or a big grained, small leaf variety whose seeds can be used as a grain. Here is my Winter Greens soup recipe which include both of these weeds:

Winter Greens soup

INGREDIENTS:
1 tbs olive oil
2 onions with their greens, chopped
2 tbs chopped wild garlic leaves
2 cups of chopped spinach
2 cups of chopped nettles
2 cups of chopped marog leaves
a handful of white rice, amaranth or quinoa
1 litre of veg stock
Salt and pepper
Plain yoghurt or cream to drizzle over each bowl
METHOD:
Cook the onions and garlic over a medium heat until the onions are translucent. Add the rice, stir, cover with a lid and turn the heat down and cook for about 15 mins. Add the stock and the greens and cook for a further 15 mins. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve hot and drizzle the yoghurt or cream over each and garnish with a sprig of herbs.

Wild greens soup

You can enjoy this soup along with many other delicious wild food dishes at our Forage Harvest and Feast courses starting up again at the end of July.

FORAGE HARVEST FEAST
Fynbos Foraging Course
This half day course takes place in and around the Good Hope Gardens Nursery in Cape Point
Each course is different according to seasonality and availability in the gardens and the Fynbos. Explore the gardens, discover and pick edible floral foods and fresh organic vegetables. Learn about indigenous edibles, and how to utilize them in your kitchen, how to grow them in your garden and their medicinal properties. Notes and recipes on the plants that we use in the meal will be provided.
You will enjoy wild food snacks and drinks, a delicious meal shared by the group made from ingredients that we will forage and harvest along the way and end with a decadent wild desert, Fynbos tea and Buchu brandy.

Email roushanna@hotmail for more details.

Winter Wild Food – courses, competitions and events

Winter:

Smokey wood fires. Hearty stews. Gum boots. The sound of rain on the roof. Icy wind that takes your breath away. Fynbos foraging.

So many wild winter greens are popping up. You can practically hear the plants growing after all the rain. It’s also time for our Forage Harvest and Feast courses to start again.

Take a look at some photos from last year..

Foraging course classroom

Fynbos foraging

Picking coriander

Foraging course

Fynbos foraging

Foraging course Cape Town

Forage Harvest Feast

Veldkool and winter peas

Beetroot, Carissa berry and apple relish on bree

Wild garlic rolls

Forage classroom

We will be confirming course dates soon and hope to be starting at the end of July.

If you are wondering what our local wild flavours taste like and would like to hear more about Indigenous edibles, join us at the next Food Dialogue series presented by Oranjezicht City Farm at entitled “Explore Local Food: Think Indigenous” where we will be catering. Arrive hungry for knowledge and with an appetite to match.

We are also running a competition on our Facebook page where you can win two tickets to  any one of our Fynbos Forage courses this year. Click here to enter.

If you would like to add your name to the Forage Harvest and Feast mailing list to be notified of any upcoming foraging courses – please email me at roushanna@hotmail.com

Keep warm and enjoy the rain.

Mushroom foraging

The soil is moist, the days are cool, the rain has fallen.

Its time for mushrooming in the forest.

forest

The atmosphere in the forest is calm and clear and fresh. Under the pine needle mulch, the earth teems with life.

Led by my father, a very keen and experienced mushroom hunter, we were hoping to find the romantically common named saffron milk cap/pine rings or the scientifically named Lactarius deliciosus. The Latin name says it all.

In the parking lot, we met foragers returning from the forest. With baskets in hand and a glint in the eye, foragers are easy to identify.

What was collected and how they were going to prepare them were discussed. Then we were off, excited and dreaming of mushroom dishes already.

Mushroom foraging

These orange-brown fungi start popping up in the Autumn in the acidic soil under conifers. If they are handled too much, they bruise a dark green colour. Knives are used for harvesting and baskets are used for collecting them in, so any spores that are released from the gills may fall back down onto the ground.

Rusulla mushroomThe first mushrooms we spotted were one of the toxic Russula species. These were quickly shown to the children to identify as poisonous. Please – never go mushroom foraging without an experienced mushroomer – there are far too many seriously toxic species out there. Don’t risk it – this is a job for a knowledgeable human, not Google images.

Wild brambles

Wild brambles were spotted. But no mushrooms yet.

We were not the only species foraging in the forest.

Finding ourselves surrounded by a big troop of baboons, we stopped gazing down and looked around. A huge alpha male, mothers, uncles, aunties, sisters, brothers and babies. About 20 Chacma baboons were playing and slowly making their way up the mountain, scratching and nibbling at bits and pieces along the way.

BaboonsbaboonsBaboons

Two massive baboons had recently and unusually raided our house, terrifying our kids in the process. So it was quite special to walk quietly through this playful and nonchalant troop and watch and enjoy them in their own environment as opposed to being fearful of them in ours. My kids now have a different outlook on them and the fear factor is somewhat reduced.

BaboonChacma BaboonsThe real foragers.

And then we found them. Nestled in between some wild Centella asiatica, a couple of beautiful orange caps were winking at us. Our mushroom eyes were now open – let the hunt begin!

Mushroom foraging

Pine ring mushrooming

Mushroom hunting

Pine ring mushroom foraging

Mushroom foraging

Wild mushrooms

Did you know there is such a thing as mushroomers etiquette? Never pick the small ones, rather leave them to grow bigger. He who finds it, picks it. Dont wander over to where a stranger has struck it lucky and start picking, its rude. If you have founds loads and a sad forager walks by with nothing in their basket, you can share a few if you are feeling generous.

Mushroom foraging

Satisfied with our gathered goods and our afternoons adventures, we made our way back down the mountain, discussing recipes and getting hungrier and hungrier with each step.

Mushrooms fried with garlic and fresh herbs in butter. Eaten on toast. Blended up for a hearty soup. Mushroom risotto. Mushroom quiche. Mushroom omelet. Creamy mushroom pasta. Mushroom steaks slow baked with Camembert and rosemary.

Mushroom foraging

Unfortunately I have no food photos to show you – somehow the eating of the food became more important than the photographing of it.  But I can assure you they were the best mushroom omelet and mushroom, Bree and rosemary quiche ever. Next time I will take photos, I promise – for there are more mushroom forages to come. We thank you mycelium. If you want to join us, we will be going on a few very small grouped forages this winter – email roushanna@hotmail.com for more info.

Keep warm and happy Autumn!

 

Febuary coastal foraging

On the 1st of Feb we had another really fun Coastal Forage.

Awesome people, fantastic conversation and scrumptious food!

Amongst all the awesome people on the course, Cape Nature botanist Rupert Koopman and his beautiful wife Florence De Vries also joined us. Florence took all the stunning photos in this post. Thank you!!!

coastal foragingThese boots were made for foraging…

Coastal foragingA little bit if info shared,

Coastal foragingfor collecting our foraged goods.

Coastal foragingMmmmmm mussels!

Coastal foragingWrack it and stack it. On my plate please….Wrack seaweed coleslaw. A thing of beauty and taste.

Coastal foragingApplying a seaweed face masks for amazing health and cosmetic benefits.

Coastal ForageIncluding instant happiness,

Coastal forageAnd ultimate bliss.

Coastal ForagingRustic ingredients for a gourmet meal.

The 1st of March and the 31st of March – both starting at 9am – are our next Coastal Forage dates.

Join us as we play like kids and eat like kings, and learn a little bit along the way too.

Contact roushanna@hotmail.com for more info or to book.

2014

Happy 2014!

Here we are. In the future. The 2000’s – a world of robots and information at the touch of a button, food supplements in a pill, romance through a computer screen and commercial space travel.

But scratch at the surface  and discover we are all searching for a balance….

Yoga. Meditation. Detox. Me time. Time out. Book club. Fight club. Wine club? Outdoor festivals. Indoor exercise. Gardening. Chocolate. Hiking. Bach remedies. Extreme sports. Green juice. Journaling. Nut milk. Tantra. Scrapbooking. Sleep.

Happy, healthy, body mind and spirit.

Trying to get back to nature and live a lifestyle as organic and as healthy as we can. Back to basics, the Slow movement, reconnecting with our food, connecting with our community and being in the moment.

If you’re reading this, you have probably had too much screen time already today. Straighten your back, roll your shoulders and remember to go for a walk barefoot after reading this. Maybe just first quickly check your Facebook and your email.

And obviously have a glance at your phone. Oooh a new WhatsApp message!

Our lives are crazy. Things are so busy and exciting and tiring all at once and screen time is at an all high. A Pinterest board for groceries? No seriously now. Maybe they just lost their pen and paper.

So just chill out man. Like fully.

Come on a Coastal forage and have fun and meet great people and eat good food…..

A big thank you Loubie Rusch from Making Kos who took a break from creating her amazing food and joined us to snap all these amazing photos at our last Coastal Forage.

Coastal foraging

Coastal foraging

Coastal foraging

Coastal foraging

Coastal foraging

Nori - PorphyraCoastal foraging

Kelp - Ecklonia

Coastal foraging

Ulva - sea lettuce

coastal foraging

Coastal foraging

Coastal Foraging

Coastal foraging

Coastal foraging - face mask

Coastal foraging

Coastal foraging

Coastal foraging

Coastal foragingYum.

New 2014 Coastal Foraging dates:
Dates: Saturday the 1st of Feb – 10am
Saturday the 1st of March – 9am
Sunday the 31st of March – 9am
Price: R300 per person

The reason these courses are only once a month is because the dates and times are organized around the low tide at new moon (spring tides) to ensure maximum enjoyment in the rock pools as this is when the tide is out the furthest.
Please email roushanna@hotmail.com if you would like to book or have any questions and we will send you further details.

Hope you can join us!