Category: Fynbos flavours

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

We invite you to come and experience this once-off pop-up event dedicated to sustainable cuisine that will tantalise all of your senses.

The meal will be created by the Forage Harvest Feast team, using fresh seasonal ingredients and locally produced products, transforming them into delicious foods.
Vegetables, herbs and wild foods will be picked and prepared on site that day from the Good Hope Gardens vegetable gardens. We will also be using indigenous edibles, seaweeds, floral foods and local artisan products.

Quality not quantity is to be observed and that means limited spaces! There will only be 50 seats available at the Secret Garden Feast so please book soon to avoid disappointment.

For your entertainment, you will be able to feast your ears and eyes on the five-piece Middle Eastern/Gypsy/Balkan fusion band, Ottoman Slap. Bringing you original compositions and traditional music with a twist – from Middle Eastern, Kletzmer, Andalusian, Romanian folk songs, and finally, to a mesmerising Tribal Fusion belly dancer to leave you enchanted!

The Secret Garden Feast will be held outdoors in the Indigenous plant nursery at Good Hope Gardens in Cape Point on Sunday the 12th of October at 4pm.

Tickets: R400 per person

Expect: edible center pieces, dancing, connection, community, real food and the unexpected.

To book contact Roushanna Gray at roushanna@hotmail.com

The Secret Garden Feast

 

Forage Harvest feast – August

This weekend we held one of the last Forage Harvest Feast fynbos forages of the season with amazing people, beautiful weather and delicious food.

Reconnecting with our food and gaining knowledge about our edible Indigenous landscape evoked interesting conversation that flowed around the like minded crowd.

Coleonema oatcakes and Salvia goats cheese

Coleonema “confetti bush” oatcakes and Salvia goats cheese

Buchu brandy

Buchu brandy

The forage classrooms table

The forage classroom.

Forage Harvest Feast

Washing and sorting the forage and harvested goods.

Edible flowers

Edible flower power.

Forage and Harvest course

Sorting the harvest.

Reconnecting to your food

Slow Food – the sweet life.

Wild herb cheeses

Wild herb cheeses

CWild food community meals

Making rainbow salads.

Wild garlic rolls

Wild garlic rolls.

Cooking lunch at Forage Harvest Feast

Cooking up a storm.

Wild food Feast

Feast!

Honeybush and lemon Pelargonium cupcakes

Honeybush and lemon Pelargonium cupcakes.

If you would like to join us on our last Forage Harvest Feast of the season, or bring your kids to join our Kids Forage and Harvest mornings, contact us soon as spaces are filling up quickly.

Forage Harvest Feast

September the 13th – Saturday from 10am-2pm

Kids Forage and Harvest mornings

Saturday 27th of September 10am – 12pm PIZZA
Monday  29th of September 2pm – 4pm PIZZA
Thursday 2nd of October 2pm – 4pm SCONES
Saturday 4th of October 10am – 12pm SCONES

For more info and to book please email roushanna@hotmail.com

 

Forage Harvest Feast

A few weeks ago we had our first Forage Harvest Feast of the season.

It was cold, wet and delicious.

We had a very interesting crowd, including the talented Kate Higgs, who joined us with her magic photography skills.

Here is a little bit of what we got up to…

Peppermint PelargoniumPelargonium tomentosum

Foraging toolsTools

Urban hunter gathererThe Urban Hunter Gatherer digging up some wild garlic – Tulbaghia violacea.

Medicinal Indigeous plantsDescribing medicinal uses for sour fig – Carpobrotus edulis.

VeldkoolVeldkool season – Trachyandra.

Forage Harvest Feast

A sensory experience.

City of EdenAnna Shevel of The City of Eden with her basket of goods.

Wild foodGood Hope honey and raw wild berry jam

Organic vegOrganic veg.

Foaging course Cape TownWashing and chatting.

Foraged ingredientsA foraged herb basket.

Table Bay Hotel chefsChefs from the Table Bay Hotel having fun and chopping up a storm

Wild greens pestoThe Pesto Queen

Forage Harvest FeastFrom bush to table…

Centre for Optimal HealthFeast!

Pelargonium and HoneybushcupcakesPelargonium and Honeybush cupcakes.

Fynbos Foraging courseIf you would like to join us for a Forage Harvest Feast, here are the upcoming course dates:

Saturday the 16th of August, 10am – 2pm FULLY BOOKED

Saturday the 30th of August, 10am – 2pm

Saturday the 4th of October, 10am – 2pm

To book or for more info email roushanna@hotmail.com

 

Incredible edible adventure

This is a story about an edible landscape. Of our origins. Of our relationship with the sea. I’ll try and get my facts straight, but I am very caught up in the romance of it all…

Once upon a time, long long ago – between 123,000 and 195,000 years ago – the world went through a harsh climate change. A great Ice Age wiped out all human existence.

Wait. What?

All human existence?

No.

Because at the tip of dry and arid Africa, along a little strip of the Southern coast, there was a small group of about 600-700 people living, surviving and thriving on the indigenous edibles around them.

This would help explain the fact that humans have less genetic diversity than other species, which initially sparked the idea for researchers that humans were once reduced to a small population.

In this cold glacial period, ice sheets covered large parts of the earth lowering the sea level. There were intermittent warm periods where the sea level rose again, and this is when the Pinnacle Point caves in Mossel Bay were inhabited. In colder times when the sea receded, other caves were used which are now covered by the sea.

These Palaeolithic ancestors of ours lived in caves about 2-5kms from the sea. They were sustained by a unique, stable diet of nutrient rich shellfish full of Omega-3 fatty acids foraged from the intertidal rock pools as well as plant food from the abundant vegetation around them. Protein came from the land animals they could catch, but more importantly they had a steady supply of shellfish including brown mussels, periwinkles, alikreukel, abalone and the occasional beached whale. Carbohydrates came in the form of various underground tubers, roots, corms and bulbs foraged in the veld.

Fascinating research by an international team headed by palaeoanthropologist Curtis Marean from the Institute of Human Origins of the Arizona State University, show that this is where Early Modern Man evolved. Professor Marean says: “We found that the people who lived in the Caves approximately 164,000 years ago were systematically harvesting shellfish from the coast; that they were using complex bladelet technology to produce complex tools; and that they regularly used ochre as pigments for symboling. This is some of the earliest evidence for modern human behaviour.”

This year the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University at the George Campus hosted 35 scientist at the Palaeoscape 2014 Symposium. Organised by distinguished Professor Richard Cowling of the botany department at the NMMU, there were many speakers including Professor Curtis Marean, Professor Tim Noakes of the Exercise and Sports Science at the University of Cape Town and human ecologist Jan de Vynck.

So we were honoured, very excited and a little nervous when we were invited to cater for the opening dinner of this Symposium. One warm and clear Saturday morning, we began our wild food adventure. Led by the amazingly knowledgeable Jan de Vynck, we foraged for Indigenous edibles plants, snorkeled off the harbour and collected shellfish from the sea. It also happened to be hunting season, but unfortunately we had left our rock hunting tools at home (joke), so we bought some excellent Kudu and Ostrich steaks at the local butchery.

Please note that this was a purely scientific research exercise. The underground roots and corms that we found are not sustainable forms of foraging, they grow in some of the most endangered coastal zones already under threat due to urbanization and these plants in the wild should be preserved.

Here is a photo diary of our incredible edible adventure.

A HUGE thanks to Ranald McKechnie, Rayne Eaton, Martina Polly, Jamie Keenan and Tom Gray for being my foraging/surfing/catering/adventure crew.

FORAGING

Strandveld foraging

Digging for tubers

Strandveld foraging

The crew

Strandveld foraging

Ren finds a beauty – Pelargonium lobatum

Wild food foraging

To the coast

Wild food catering

Trachyandra divaricata

Underground edible corms

Ferraria crispa

Urban foraging

Urban foraging for wild cress

Coastal foraging

Alikreukel and periwinkles

Coastal foragingTalking shop

PREP

Alikreukel and periwinkles

Shellfish ready to be steamed

AAAAAH!likreukel

Aaaaahlikreukel guts!

Trachyandra falcata

Trachyandra divaricata flower buds

Strelitia seed flour

Strelitzia nicolai seed flour

Wild food catering

Wild greens

Indigenous edibles

Ferraria crispa and Dasispermum suffruticosum

Wild food chefs

Wild food chefs – that’s how we roll.

Streltia seed and wild garlic rolls

Creating Strelitzia nicolai seed and Tulbaghia violacea rolls

Chef Ranald

Trimming the Tetragona decumbens

FOOD

Oxalis mayo

Oxalis pes-caprae mayonnaise

wild food catering

Pizza with Ostrich, wild cress, goats cheese, Emex australis pesto and Pelargonium lobatum shavings

Indigenous edibles

Salvia africana-lutea infused Ferraria crispa on a bed of wild cress

Alikreukels

Alikreukels with Dasispermum suffruticosum on a bed of steamed Trachyandra, Sarcocornia and Tetragonia with Porphyra capensis seaweed butter

Wild food catering

Preserved green Searsia glauca berries on the right

Periwinkles

Periwinkles in a Tulbaghia violacea sauce

Sersia glauca berries - edibleKudu in a Searsia glauca berry sauce on a bed of wild cress

Pelargonium lobatum

Pelargonium tubers on show

Phorphyra capensis seaweed butter

Wild Atlantic Nori butter – Porphyra capensis

Strelitia nicolai seeds

Strelitzia nicolai seed and Tulbaghia violacea rolls

Honeybush cupcakes

Honeybush cupcakes with cream, wild berry jam and Carissa macrocarpa berries

How to eat a periwinkle

Explaining how to eat the periwinkles

Wild food catering

Describing the methods of cooking

Wild food catering

Botany jokes

The queue at the wild food catering at NMMU

Queue for dinner

Wild Food Catering

The feast!

We hope you enjoyed this. We had so much fun creating this dinner, from forage to finish. Our relationship with the sea and veld blooms in our continual wild food experimentation which always turns into a social occasion or educational experience. Either way is usually delicious.

For more info on our wild food catering, sustainable Coastal foraging and Forage Harvest Feast courses, email roushanna@hotmail.com

Hashtag farmlife

Winter is alive.

The squelch of mud under your gumboots, the soft touch of rain on your face, the warmth of a fire in the evening. Dams filling up, rivers flowing, crisp winter greens.Bright copper kettles with warm woolen mittens. You get the idea.

Have you ever seen a sheep shake off rain like a dog does? Its brilliant. The sheep-shake is the new essence of winter for me. That and spinning wool by the fire. The smell of lanolin as I peddle barefoot. 2000 and what did you say?

We might be hippies but we like to think we are hip. We know about things like hashtags and pinterest and instagram.

Here are some photos of #farmlife #capepoint #goodhopegardens

Bee collecting pollen on an AloeBusy bee collecting pollen from an Aloe flower.

PeasWinter peas

Angulare tortoiseAngulare tortoise enjoying a little bit of sunshine.

Baboons ate the carrotsRaided by the baboons

PigsFeeding raided carrot tops to the pigs.

Happy carrotsBut not all of them were eaten. Happiness.

SheepShepherdesses

GoatThis goat. Always reaching for those goals.

Chilli seedsSeed saving – Chilli’s.

And of course, winter brings weeds. Weeds, weeds, weeds.

They have popped up all over our gardens, jostling for position in-between our flowers and veg. There is a cute saying that goes

Weeds – If you cant beat them, eat them.

Many weeds are edible, but you must be able to identify them correctly before attempting any wild weedy snacks as there are also many poisonous ones out there. Two good ones to start with would be Marog or Imfino – our local Lambsquarters and family of the Amaranth, and of course Urtica dioica the stinging Nettle.

Wild greens - marogo and nettle

Nettles are a mega nutrient high superfood. Its best to wear gloves when picking them and if you put them in a bowl and pour hot water over them, the stinging properties go away, leaving you to handle them freely. Marog comes in many different varieties, ranging from red through to dark green. You get a small grained, big leafed variety whose leaves you can use like spinach or a big grained, small leaf variety whose seeds can be used as a grain. Here is my Winter Greens soup recipe which include both of these weeds:

Winter Greens soup

INGREDIENTS:
1 tbs olive oil
2 onions with their greens, chopped
2 tbs chopped wild garlic leaves
2 cups of chopped spinach
2 cups of chopped nettles
2 cups of chopped marog leaves
a handful of white rice, amaranth or quinoa
1 litre of veg stock
Salt and pepper
Plain yoghurt or cream to drizzle over each bowl
METHOD:
Cook the onions and garlic over a medium heat until the onions are translucent. Add the rice, stir, cover with a lid and turn the heat down and cook for about 15 mins. Add the stock and the greens and cook for a further 15 mins. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve hot and drizzle the yoghurt or cream over each and garnish with a sprig of herbs.

Wild greens soup

You can enjoy this soup along with many other delicious wild food dishes at our Forage Harvest and Feast courses starting up again at the end of July.

FORAGE HARVEST FEAST
Fynbos Foraging Course
This half day course takes place in and around the Good Hope Gardens Nursery in Cape Point
Each course is different according to seasonality and availability in the gardens and the Fynbos. Explore the gardens, discover and pick edible floral foods and fresh organic vegetables. Learn about indigenous edibles, and how to utilize them in your kitchen, how to grow them in your garden and their medicinal properties. Notes and recipes on the plants that we use in the meal will be provided.
You will enjoy wild food snacks and drinks, a delicious meal shared by the group made from ingredients that we will forage and harvest along the way and end with a decadent wild desert, Fynbos tea and Buchu brandy.

Email roushanna@hotmail for more details.

Winter Wild Food – courses, competitions and events

Winter:

Smokey wood fires. Hearty stews. Gum boots. The sound of rain on the roof. Icy wind that takes your breath away. Fynbos foraging.

So many wild winter greens are popping up. You can practically hear the plants growing after all the rain. It’s also time for our Forage Harvest and Feast courses to start again.

Take a look at some photos from last year..

Foraging course classroom

Fynbos foraging

Picking coriander

Foraging course

Fynbos foraging

Foraging course Cape Town

Forage Harvest Feast

Veldkool and winter peas

Beetroot, Carissa berry and apple relish on bree

Wild garlic rolls

Forage classroom

We will be confirming course dates soon and hope to be starting at the end of July.

If you are wondering what our local wild flavours taste like and would like to hear more about Indigenous edibles, join us at the next Food Dialogue series presented by Oranjezicht City Farm at entitled “Explore Local Food: Think Indigenous” where we will be catering. Arrive hungry for knowledge and with an appetite to match.

We are also running a competition on our Facebook page where you can win two tickets to  any one of our Fynbos Forage courses this year. Click here to enter.

If you would like to add your name to the Forage Harvest and Feast mailing list to be notified of any upcoming foraging courses – please email me at roushanna@hotmail.com

Keep warm and enjoy the rain.

Veldkos

Veldkos.

What is veldkos? The direct translation from Afrikaans is veld meaning bush and kos meaning food.

Its Indigenous edible plants.  A rich and under-utilized food source that grows naturally in South Africa. Far more water wise than normal veg and herbs. You probably have some growing in your garden right now.

 There are various indigenous edible leaves, roots, shoots and berries that can contribute to our every day diet. Read up about it,speak to people involved in the plant world, go to talks and demonstrations, chat to people in your community and those with Indigenous plant knowledge. Experiment with recipes and share the information you find with othersWe should preserve this fading knowledge and spread around it for everyone to learn, re-discover and enjoy in our modern world.

Just make sure you can positively identify the plant before eating as there are also a lot of very toxic plants out there. Also be sure to get permission to harvest plants off the land if it is not your property and harvest sustainably – underground corms, roots and bulbs are not sustainable to harvest unless you are happy to do so in your own garden or they are seriously prolific and seen as a weed in many areas. So many species have become extinct or are rare and endangered because of over harvesting in the wild.

If you think that wild food would taste bland and bitter – think again! Yes, some of them like Aloe and Tsama melons and Orbea are incredibly (indelibly?) bitter – but these just need to go through a process. Some need leaching, some to be soaked in a slaked lime solution, and others to be roasted over hot coals. All could become amazing additions to our meals. The following should always be taken into consideration: What parts of the plant may be used, when to harvest, how to prepare them and if you should be cautious in the amounts you eat.

Two great books to start with would be Renata Coetzee‘s Koekemakranka and Food from the Veld by F.W Fox and M.E Norwood Young.

Here is a wonderful display of Indigenous edible plants by Zayaan Khan at a recent IKSDC event at Joule City in Cape Town.

Indigenous edible plants

Indigenous edible plants

Tsama melons

Forage Harvest Feast were catering with Fynbos flavours to enhance the food.

Wild food cateringSeaweed briani rice with Porphyra capensis plus Wild garlic (Tulbaghia violacea) and sweet potato stew on the menu

Salvia africana-lutea and fish samoosasSalvia africana-lutea and fish samoosas

Rooibos cupcakes and lemon butter icingRooibos cupcakes and lemon butter icing.

Start planting indigenous edible into your garden to literally star reaping the benefits.

We have started a Veldkos garden here at the nursery – its baby steps all the way, and will be a long labour of love for many years – but promises to be a delicious journey. View the planting progress in photos here.

This weekend at the Kirstenbosch Annual Indigenous Plant Fair we had a stall selling our plants from Good Hope Gardens Nursery. 

We also promoted Indigenous edible plants and had some Fynbos Flavour tasters from the Forage Harvest Feast range. See what we got up to here.

For some local Indigenous food inspiration, visit these guys:

!Khwa ttu

Oep vir Koep

Solms Delta

Making Kos

 How fascinating to imagine that man used plants for food, medicine and for poisons. How sad it would be to lose this knowledge. Lets try to revive the way we connect to our natural surrounds and learn to use the plants growing naturally in our area as food. I hope this post has made you hungry for Indigenous edible plant knowledge!

Wild Food catering

This weekend I made local wild food tasters for some Japanese seaweed scientists.

No pressure.

Wild cocktails

Wild mint and buchu brandy cocktails

Wild food startersBuchu brandy is excellent for settling the stomach. So after a heavy meal a shot of this would do you good….nice excuse!

Wild food seashoreCrumbed black mussels on a bed of wild nori

Limpet and periwinkle samoosasShe sells sea shells on the sea shore…

Wild food cateringLimpet, periwinkle and “krimpvarkie” seaweed samoosas

Sour figsPerfectly ripe, rainbow coloured sour figs

Ulva chilli bitesUlva seaweed and wild sage chillibites

Seaweed coleslawBrassicophycus and Chordariopsus seaweed coleslaw salad with edible wild flowers.

Wild garlic rollsNever-fail wild garlic rolls

Wild food dessertAnd for something sweet….

Agar-agar mini milk-tart “boats” with candied kelp and Carissa flowers.

Hope this keeps you inspired – Have a totally wild week!

Wild food supper

We recently had some friends in the field (pun intended) over for a wild food supper.

I thought I’d share with you some of the dishes we ate.

But first the prep. Gathering ingredients for wild foods is fun and adventurous and sometimes a little crazy.

Like surfing for our seaweed, or in this case, climbing up a ladder to collect the dried Strelitzia nicolai flowers towering overhead. You can eat the fresh seeds raw and the dried ones can be ground up and used as a flour. Just remember to leave more than you collect.

Strelitzia nicolaiStrelitzia nicolia dried flowers heads

Then you have to brave the bugs and spiders to find the beautiful golden fynbos pirate treasure inside the very hard seed pods.

Strelitzia seedsStrelitzia n. seeds

The seeds are like little hard black coffee beans with a white inside that can be ground up. The gorgeous orange fluff attached to them is the aril that is also edible. It’s a lot of work for a small amount of flour, but a labour of love is usually delicious!

wild food dessertAgar agar and strawberry brule w. Carissa macrocarpa flower and Strilitzia shortcake

Pictured above on the left you can see the final product…I used the flour to make a shortcake and included the aril for added edible decoration.

So now I will backtrack to the starters. Sorry. Its like reading one of those books that the beginning is in the middle and you start at the end and finish in the future. Confusing and edgy. Exciting and wonderful –  like these sweet and salty seaweed nutsSeaweed nuts

This a super easy, highly tasty snack to make. Whether you are hosting a Rugby Watching Braai or a Canape and Cocktail Soiree, these will go down a treat.

Using freshly washed and rinsed sea lettuce or Ulva, chop up a cup full and toss with assorted nuts. season with sea salt and sugar and pop in the oven on a low heat until the nuts are golden brown and the seaweed is crispy.

Yum.

We also enjoyed oven baked periwinkle and seaweed samoosas

Periwinkle samoosas

Periwinkle samoosasPeriwinkle and seaweed samoosas

Seaweed couscous salad – get the recipe here.

Couscous seaweed saladUlva couscous salad with wild garlic flowers

Never-fail-to-please ruby relish on Bree

Carissa and beetroot relish on breeCarissa macrocarpa berry and beetroot relish topped with Carissa bispinosa berries.

Wild garlic rolls and farm butter

Tulbaghia rollsTulbaghia violacea rolls

These were used to mop up the exquisite juices of the mussels….

Musssels and spekboomMussels in a creamy white wine sauce with garlic, thyme, Salvia chamelaeagnea, Portulacaria afra and whole baby onions.

For dips we had Morogo, Wild garlic and King Protea seed pesto and a Wild sage sour cream

Morogo pesto and salvia sour creamMorogo, Tulbaghia violacea and Protea cyneriodes seed pesto. Sheeps milk sour-cream flavoured with Salvia dentata.

We hope this inspires you to be creative and adventurous with your cooking this year –

Happy 2014!

 

Kids Forage and Harvest Morning – Pizza!

Last Saturday we had such a fun laughter filled Kids Forage and Harvest morning!

Our lovely group of excited kids collected wild herbs, edible flowers and garden veg to create and eat PIZZA!

And yes, moms and dads, grannies and grandpa’s – they ate ALL THEIR VEG UP!!!

The mothers who were there were all very pleased with this and asked when the next one was…. It’s this coming Saturday the 9th of November!

Here are some highlights from our morning:

Kids foraging courseWere off!

Kids Foraging coursePicking carrots

Kids forage morningBella the pig!

Kids forage and Harvest morningChecking the goods

Farm animalsFarm animals!

Kids Forgae and Harvest morningRinsing the flowers

Carrot manMr Carrot Man

Kids Forage and HarvestCreating edible masterpieces

Kids forage and harvest courseYum!

Foraged and harvested pizzaSo tasty!

Kids forage and harvest morningSay cheese!

Hope you can join us at our next exciting morning 🙂