Category: Good Hope Gardens Nursery

Kelp and Sea lettuce Roll recipe

Have a look at my new Kelp and Sea lettuce Roll video recipe on You Tube, created on SABC 3’s Expresso breakfast show:

For those of you who have attended our coastal forages in the past few months, you will be familiar with this recipe and know how fun and easy it is to make and how delicious and nutritious it tastes!

Enjoy!

Fynbos Foraging Course Dates

Fynbos Foraging Course – Forage Harvest Feast

Forage Harvest Feast at Good Hope Gardens Nursery

Introductory half day forage and feasting experience

WHO IS THIS COURSE FOR:

Aimed at adults but children are welcome to join their parents. Anyone who has an interest in gardening, in wild food, foraging or indigenous edibles. Chefs wanting to discover new ingredients or foodies wanting to play with the diverse wild flavours in our Indigenous edibles. People interested in Fynbos, in vegetable gardening, self sufficiency, in the Slow Food movement or those that just want to have a unique and delicious experience at a beautiful venue with like minded people.
WHAT TO EXPECT:
Each course is different according to the season and availability in the gardens and the bush. Explore the gardens, discover and pick edible floral foods and fresh organic vegetables. Forage for indigenous edibles, learn how to sustainably harvest them, utilize them in your kitchen, grow them in your garden and some of their medicinal properties. Learn about wild herbs and how to preserve and prepare them. After snacks and a gathering tour we will get creative in the foraging classroom kitchen and prepare and share a feast.

WHAT IS INCLUDED:
This half day course includes wild food snacks and drinks, a delicious three course lunch based on ingredients foraged, harvested and prepared by the group. You will also receive information sheets and recipes on the plants that we will use in the meal.

WHAT TO BRING:
Gumboots or comfortable walking shoes, raincoat/sun hat – suitable outdoor gear. Cameras are welcome. Don’t forget an open mind and your sense of humour!

BONUS:

You can also enjoy a 10% discount in the nursery retail should you wish to purchase any indigenous plants for your garden.

PRICE:
R500 p/person or R1800 for group of four. Children under 17yrs R200, Children under 2yrs free. Full payment will secure your booking as spaces are limited.

DURATION:
10am – 2pm

DATES:

June 27thJuly 25th, August 15thAugust 29th

VENUE:

Good Hope Gardens Nursery, Plateau Rd (M65),Cape Point

GUIDES:

Roushanna and Gael Gray

IS THIS SUITABLE FOR VEGETARIANS:

Yes – all the dishes on this course are vegetarian, and all food intolerances are catered for, please let us know in advance.

MAX NUMBER OF PEOPLE PER COURSE:

16

AVAILABLE FOR A PRIVATE FUNCTION:

Yes – Min number of people required: 10.
TO BOOK:
email roushanna@hotmail.com

Fynbos Foraging Course

Goodbye Coastal Foraging courses, see you in November!

On a blustery, grey skied morning, our final group gathered at the beach for the last coastal forage of the season.

All our forages are run according to the season, and this one has sadly come to a close for now, but don’t worry – we will be resuming the coastal forages in November!

Reasoning for our seasonal coastal foraging includes: the bitter cold winds and weather at the beach in the colder months,big swells making for dangerous foraging close to the tide line and bigger wave action leading to less seaweed in the rock pools through bashing of the algae and sweeping organisms out of the pools.

If the hold-fast or roots of these washed-away seaweeds remain on the rocks, they will regrow in Spring,Like plants, there are also annual and perennial seaweeds, so in winter some will die off and only grow again in Spring.We give them this break to regenerate and from late spring to early summer is the time when all seaweeds are highest in nutrients with their succulent new growth, bursting with vital vitamins and minerals, highly beneficial for your health.

Here are some beautiful photos taken at our last coastal forage by the very talented Sitaara Stodel.

Coastal Foraging Cape Town

Coastal Foraging South Africa

Coastal Foraging

Coastal foraging Cape Town

Porphyra capensis

Coastal Foraging Cape Town

Seaweed coastal foraging

Coastal Foraging

Coastal Foraging Cape Town

Coastal Foraging - Good Hope Gardens Nursery

Edible seaweed and shellfish

Coastal Foraging

Dead mans fingers

Coastal Foraging South Africa

Coastal Foraging

Coastal Foraging

Kelp

Organic Veg - Forage Harvest Feast

Edible seaweed

Coastal Foraging course Cape Town

Edible sea lettuce seaweed

Coastal Foraging with seaweeds

Seaweed salad

Cooking with seaweed

Seaweed face mask

Seaweed face mask

Kelp sushi rolls

Coastal Foraging Course

Seaweed coleslaw

Mussel pot with tomatoes and thyme

Coastal Foraging cooking course

Kelp and cocoa icecream

Up next – news of Fynbos Feast events, Veld and Sea inspired pop-up dinners and the upcoming Fynbos Foraging courses dates. Watch this space!

Grewia occidentalis recipe

Grewia occidentalis is commonly known as kruisbessie or cross-berry tree. It is a fast growing small tree or large shrub, hardy, has fibrous roots and grows in a variety of soil conditions. It can be planted in full sun or shade, and makes a great wind break. Once mature, it likes to be pruned. They can grow up to 5 meters, wind dependent.

Grewia occidentalis

It has very strong wood that does not splinter and was used traditionally by the bushmen to make bows and by the Xhosa and Zulu to make bows and handles for axes and assegaai’s. It also has a host of magical and medicinal properties including using the bark as a shampoo to combat grey hair and making a tea out of the leaves and twigs to ease childbirth or for impotency and bareness.

It attracts butterflies, is loved by birds for its tasty berries and carpenter bees often find a home in its wood and relish the pollen from pretty ten petaled mauve star-shaped flowers. Livestock enjoy the bark and leaves.Grewia occidentalis flower

It forms a four lobed fruit, green at first and then ripening to a golden reddish brown waxy fruit. These fruits are sweet and chewy with a tough skin and a big pip. They were used by bushmen as snacks particularly for long journeys as they kept well as dried fruit. Other culinary uses include flavouring porridge, the fruit crushed for juice and either taken fresh or fermented for beer, boiled with milk or used in a goats milk yoghurt.

Grewia occidentalis berries

We have a big Grewia tree outside our house, filled with life – at the moment the berries are just beginning to ripen, and the garden is filled with the sounds of the birds and bees, butterflies and insects busy in the branches, flitting from flower to flower. I too, was in the tree. Dangling precariously from the treehouse planks, tiptoeing on the little branches, looking for some ripe fruit for my recipe. Crazed by the idea in my head, I even forgot about my fear of heights. Not dangerous at all. Especially when we spotted a massive snake in the tree a few hours later.

Hot crossberry drink.

Hot Crossberry drink - Grewia occidentalis

Ingredients:

1 handful of ripe Grewia o. berries

1 cup of milk ( I used goats milk)

A few half opened Grewia o. flowers.

Method:

Put the berries and milk into a saucepan and bring to the boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 10 mins. Pour through a strainer and sieve, squashing all the flavoured milk through with the back of a spoon. Pour into a cup, serve warm. Pop a few semi opened flowers on top of the drink and watch as they open up completely with the heat of the drink. Smile as everyone claps.

This drink is deliciously malty and sweet with a hint of fruit, creamy in texture and a dreamy caramel colour.

Result!

Cheers to Indigenous food revival.

Grewia occidentalis

Grewia occidentalis berries

*references:

plantzafrica.com 

Indigenous Healing Plants – Margaret Roberts

Food from the Veld – F.W.Fox and M. E. Norwood Young

Tom Gray from Good Hope Gardens Landscaping

Foraging with MasterChef SA

Episode 15 of MasterChef SA aired last week on MNET, and the top 5 contestants were told they had to forage for their main ingredients from the beach, Fynbos and forest floor.

It was such a great experience to meet them at Scarborough beach and take them to the inter tidal rock-pools to forage for mussels, periwinkles and edible seaweed and then on to Good Hope Gardens Nursery for a Fynbos forage for herbs and aromatic to compliment the harvested sea ingredients. The contestant were a charming, friendly and super enthusiastic group and I could see recipes running through their minds as they discovered a whole range of new flavours in the wild.

Foraging at Good Hope Gardens Nursery

Click on these video links to see more of what we got up to

Foraging with MasterChef SA

With the rising trend of foraging, concern for sustainable foraging is high, and with the fantastic platform of national television, I stressed this point as best I could.

Sustainable foraging

After foraging in the Deep South, they went to meet mushroom guru Gary Goldman in the forest and was guided by his passionate expertise and foraged some choice specimens.

Mushroom foraging with Gary

The contestants did well in the kitchen and created beautiful dishes with their foraged goods.

The top two recipes were Sipho’s Polenta lasagna filled with fried mushrooms and mussels and Roxi’s wild mushroom mille-feuille with hazelnut sauce.

Delicious! Heres hoping this post will inspire everyone to get creative and go wild.

Coastal Foraging

To find out more about our Fynbos and coastal foraging courses email roushanna@hotmail.com

WIN with ILUNDI and GOOD HOPE GARDENS NURSERY

Summer is here!

And its competition time….

Join our Facebook competition and stand a chance to win an ILUNDI signature sling

PLUS

2 x tickets for a Coastal Forage with us!

Click HERE to enter.

Good luck!!!!

Win an Ilundi signature sling plus Coastal Foraging tickets

The Secret Garden Feast photo story

In the beginning of October we held a magical dining experience in a unique stetting- right in the middle of our plant retail.

Transporting guests to a place of community, nature and kindred spirits, enjoying feasting and festivities, belly dancing and the Gypsy melody’s of fantastic Ottoman Slap.

Not to mention lots of organic wine and Buchu ale.

A huge thank you to Juliette de Combes for taking these beautiful photos.

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

Ottoman Slap

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

Ottoman Slap

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

Ottoman Slap

The Secret Garden Feast

Ottoman Slap

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feat

Ottoman Slap

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

Ottoman Slap

Kelp Lasagna at The Secret Garden Feast

Ottoman Slap

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

Ottoman Slap

The Secret Garden Feast

The Secret Garden Feast

Ottoman Slap

Ottoman Slap

The Secret Garden Feast

An event not possible without a lot of help from a lot of our friends. Thanks to all who participated in the magical event.

Who wants to join our next one?