Category: Kelp

Wild Food catering

This weekend I made local wild food tasters for some Japanese seaweed scientists.

No pressure.

Wild cocktails

Wild mint and buchu brandy cocktails

Wild food startersBuchu brandy is excellent for settling the stomach. So after a heavy meal a shot of this would do you good….nice excuse!

Wild food seashoreCrumbed black mussels on a bed of wild nori

Limpet and periwinkle samoosasShe sells sea shells on the sea shore…

Wild food cateringLimpet, periwinkle and “krimpvarkie” seaweed samoosas

Sour figsPerfectly ripe, rainbow coloured sour figs

Ulva chilli bitesUlva seaweed and wild sage chillibites

Seaweed coleslawBrassicophycus and Chordariopsus seaweed coleslaw salad with edible wild flowers.

Wild garlic rollsNever-fail wild garlic rolls

Wild food dessertAnd for something sweet….

Agar-agar mini milk-tart “boats” with candied kelp and Carissa flowers.

Hope this keeps you inspired – Have a totally wild week!

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2014

Happy 2014!

Here we are. In the future. The 2000’s – a world of robots and information at the touch of a button, food supplements in a pill, romance through a computer screen and commercial space travel.

But scratch at the surface  and discover we are all searching for a balance….

Yoga. Meditation. Detox. Me time. Time out. Book club. Fight club. Wine club? Outdoor festivals. Indoor exercise. Gardening. Chocolate. Hiking. Bach remedies. Extreme sports. Green juice. Journaling. Nut milk. Tantra. Scrapbooking. Sleep.

Happy, healthy, body mind and spirit.

Trying to get back to nature and live a lifestyle as organic and as healthy as we can. Back to basics, the Slow movement, reconnecting with our food, connecting with our community and being in the moment.

If you’re reading this, you have probably had too much screen time already today. Straighten your back, roll your shoulders and remember to go for a walk barefoot after reading this. Maybe just first quickly check your Facebook and your email.

And obviously have a glance at your phone. Oooh a new WhatsApp message!

Our lives are crazy. Things are so busy and exciting and tiring all at once and screen time is at an all high. A Pinterest board for groceries? No seriously now. Maybe they just lost their pen and paper.

So just chill out man. Like fully.

Come on a Coastal forage and have fun and meet great people and eat good food…..

A big thank you Loubie Rusch from Making Kos who took a break from creating her amazing food and joined us to snap all these amazing photos at our last Coastal Forage.

Coastal foraging

Coastal foraging

Coastal foraging

Coastal foraging

Coastal foraging

Nori - PorphyraCoastal foraging

Kelp - Ecklonia

Coastal foraging

Ulva - sea lettuce

coastal foraging

Coastal foraging

Coastal Foraging

Coastal foraging

Coastal foraging - face mask

Coastal foraging

Coastal foraging

Coastal foraging

Coastal foragingYum.

New 2014 Coastal Foraging dates:
Dates: Saturday the 1st of Feb – 10am
Saturday the 1st of March – 9am
Sunday the 31st of March – 9am
Price: R300 per person

The reason these courses are only once a month is because the dates and times are organized around the low tide at new moon (spring tides) to ensure maximum enjoyment in the rock pools as this is when the tide is out the furthest.
Please email roushanna@hotmail.com if you would like to book or have any questions and we will send you further details.

Hope you can join us!

Red ribbon seaweed

For one of the desserts at our Coastal Foraging, I make an agar agar jelly treat. To do this you have to collect the red ribbon seaweed that grows on kelp fronds and boil it to extract the agar agar.

Coastal foragingAgar agar kiwi jelly and candied kelp on ice cream.

The romantic version of collecting the seaweed is on a beautiful summers day..blue skies and turquoise sea. A surfboard, a smile and a skip down the beach.

The reality is usually more like a sand-blasted walk down the beach through a howling south-easter, slipping on the porphyra strewn rocks to get to the water’s edge at low tide, holding on with your toes and getting soaked by waves trying to reach the kelp.

If you try and have a surf you could easily get smacked if the face with your board like I did today. Who needs botox right? Dear wind, please hit my lip on the other side now. Angelina Jolie roll over – this is a Deep South extreme makeover.

And if you have missed low tide, you better start looking for a limpet with a lot of red seaweed growing on its shell.

Coastal foraginglike this but more.

Today we got the romantic version….

Coastal foragingA surfboard, a smile and a skip down the beach

Coastal foragingOk and maybe one quick little wave. Or five…

Coastal foragingCollecting the seaweed.

Coastal foragingFound a good bunch! Tough job hey. Gotta love these board meetings.

Coastal foragingWoohoo! Dreamy Summertime.

Coastal foragingLets go check out the haul…

Coastal foragingNeatly stashed away in wetsuit and top

Coastal foragingThe foraged goods. Nice.

A little bit of everything here – red, brown and green seaweed to eat.

Watch out for our next blog post to see what we made…

Happy holidays!

Seaweed

We are loving seaweed at the moment. Collecting it (sustainably of course) for our animals, gardens, food and for beauty treatments!

Coastal foraging

While it is fun and exhilarating to be foraging for your own free seaweed and mussels that are growing so prolifically at our beautiful beaches, it is important to remember a few rules. In all the excitement of foraging edible seaweed, it can be subject to over harvesting – especially in a focused area which could quickly be depleted:

  1. Always be sure the sea you are collecting from is not polluted and there is no red tide when collecting mussels.

  2. Collect at the low tide, closest to the tide line as possible.

  3. Never pull seaweed off a rock, rather cut pieces off with a pair of scissors leaving its “holdfast” attached to the rock so that the rest of the plant may regrow.

  4. Only cut 1/3 of the seaweed.

  5. Only pick seaweed for culinary use that is attached to a rock, don’t collect any you find floating or washed up on shore.

  6. Only pick seaweeds that look healthy and clean.

  7. Only pick what you need!

  8. Don t collect any unusual seaweed that is sparse in the rock pools, only what you see growing prolifically in the area.

  9. Watch your back! Never have your back turned to the waves as you collect, especially when collecting those elusive big mussels clinging to the rocks on the low tide line. On a stormy day, one wave can easily sweep you out to sea.

  10. Only collect what your permit allows.

  11. Respect all wild life when you forage. Take care where you walk.

  12. Sustainable harvesting ensures regrowth, conservation and abundance for animals, sea life and for yourselves for the next season.

For a great overview on seaweed written by Rob Anderson, please read here.

For info on the three different kinds of seaweeds – brown, red and green – please click on this:

3G Algae (Seaweed & Phytoplankton)

Sea lettuce

Visit this link on the Scenic South website for my Sea Biscuit recipe using Sea Lettuce or Ulva (shown above).

Kelp saladKELP AND AVO SALAD

Ingredients:

3 kelp blades, your choice of oil for frying, 1t tbs sesame seeds, 3 avocados, salt and pepper to taste, half a lemon.

Method:

Cut strips of kelp and quick fry in a hot pan until they turn green. Take them out and put them on paper towel to drain. Put them in a salad bowl and shake over the sesame seeds. Toss until coated. Chop up the avo and add to the bowl. Squeeze in the lemon juice and season to taste. Decorate with edible flowers. Great as a sandwich filler!

Enjoy! And if you have any tasty seaweed recipes, please do share with us!