Category: Kids food

Forage Harvest feast – August

This weekend we held one of the last Forage Harvest Feast fynbos forages of the season with amazing people, beautiful weather and delicious food.

Reconnecting with our food and gaining knowledge about our edible Indigenous landscape evoked interesting conversation that flowed around the like minded crowd.

Coleonema oatcakes and Salvia goats cheese

Coleonema “confetti bush” oatcakes and Salvia goats cheese

Buchu brandy

Buchu brandy

The forage classrooms table

The forage classroom.

Forage Harvest Feast

Washing and sorting the forage and harvested goods.

Edible flowers

Edible flower power.

Forage and Harvest course

Sorting the harvest.

Reconnecting to your food

Slow Food – the sweet life.

Wild herb cheeses

Wild herb cheeses

CWild food community meals

Making rainbow salads.

Wild garlic rolls

Wild garlic rolls.

Cooking lunch at Forage Harvest Feast

Cooking up a storm.

Wild food Feast

Feast!

Honeybush and lemon Pelargonium cupcakes

Honeybush and lemon Pelargonium cupcakes.

If you would like to join us on our last Forage Harvest Feast of the season, or bring your kids to join our Kids Forage and Harvest mornings, contact us soon as spaces are filling up quickly.

Forage Harvest Feast

September the 13th – Saturday from 10am-2pm

Kids Forage and Harvest mornings

Saturday 27th of September 10am – 12pm PIZZA
Monday  29th of September 2pm – 4pm PIZZA
Thursday 2nd of October 2pm – 4pm SCONES
Saturday 4th of October 10am – 12pm SCONES

For more info and to book please email roushanna@hotmail.com

 

Tomato sauce recipe

For me, summer = tomatoes

There are so many different tomato varieties with such fun names, here are some examples:

Cherokee Purple, Lemon Boy, White Queen, Vintage Wine, Beefsteak, Green Grape, Black Russian, Yellow Stuffer.

Pretty cool. You can just imagine the colour variety.

We have been eating tomatoes all the time. As in every meal. With glut you need to get creative. Think out of the veggie box – Like in my Summer Glut post.

This time I am thinking very much In the Box. Or In the Bottle.

For my kids, tomatoes = tomato sauce, they dont really like the real thing. Which becomes a problem when your fridge is half full of them and so is your garden.

So I tried to make them a healthy version of the gloop they love so much. Are there any parents out there who have spent hours of effort in creating “delicious” healthy meals for your child only for it to be pushed aside or “Bleurgh!” to be declared after the first bite?

Yep. This was not one of those times. Success!

TOMATO SAUCE RECIPE

So first you have to put your tomatoes in boiling water for a few minutes. Then put them in cold water so they are easy to handle – now the skin is super easy to peel off.

Tomato sauce recipeTomato peels

Tomato sauce recipeYou can even peel with one hand and take photos with the other.

Tomato sauce recipePeeled toms.

Then you add HONEY (I used two tablespoons) HERBS (I used oregano and thyme, you can use anything including wild sage, caramalised onions and garlic, wild garlic or whatever your heart desires) SEA SALT (just a few crunches)

Blitz with a hand blender.

Bring to the boil and then simmer on a low heat for a few hours until the sauce has halved.

THE END

Tomato sauce recipeSo easy!

Quite delicious.

Tomato sauce recipeNot-so-fussy 1 year old eating homemade tomato sauce.

Tomato sauce recipe

Very fussy six year old boy eating homemade tomato sauce. That took hours. Miracles can happen!

Tomato sauce recipeThe grown up version on rice with basil and feta. Could work with anything – with pasta, pizza, as soup, on bread.

Goodbye Allgold. Hello kitchen. We have a winner.

Summer glut

The fragrant smell of sun warmed tomatoes is the true essence of summer to me. Watering rows of tomatoes and getting a hit of that fresh, clean smell conjures up images of cold salads, hot beaches and long hazy days.

To be honest with you, I’d rather bottle that smell over the tomatoes that would last us through winter. A whiff of summer memories versus tomato sauce…hmmm. Tough choice.

Am I the only person who would buy Eu de Tomato?

TomatoesApart from the daily colourful selection of tomatoes,

Gooseberriespackets of gooseberries

Red onionsand the occasional pram-full of onions

We have also have loads of marrows in various stages.

baby marrowsAs most veggie gardeners know, the sweet dainty marrows you get at the beginning of the season have a small window that quickly closes and they suddenly turn into uncontrollable monsters overnight with little taste, just waiting to surprise you from under their leaves early in the morning. “Haha!” you hear them cry as you spy new ones everywhere. “We are even bigger today! What will you do with us now?”

Marrows

You have to get creative. Always get creative, or your family will finally realize they are eating marrows for the fourth week running. After giving away armfuls to neighbours and friends, they eventually start avoiding you, having run out of marrow recipes. Guys, wait – don’t run so fast! There are so many, many recipes for involving marrows into almost all your meals, ranging from marrow bread to marrow chocolate brownies to stuffed marrow flowers. Here is our current favorite:

DOUBLE MARROW PASTA

This is a tasty, light, wheat free recipe. There are no quantities here, only suggestions, and you can add or omit any of the ingredients except the marrows. Obviously.

You can also shape the marrows to any pasta shape of your choice, even cut lasagna sheets out of the larger ones. They hold flavours very well so it works well as a pasta alternative and are great marinated raw.

Ingredients: Marrows, cheese, tomatoes, basil, avo, herbs, lashings of olive oil and crunches of sea salt

Peel the bigger marrows with a potato peeler until the seeds are showing. Top and tail the small ones and keep whole.

Double marrow pastaIn a pot of salted boiling water, pop the small whole marrows in. After 4 mins, add the marrow strips (the “pasta”) and remove from heat. Leave for one or two minutes, drain, toss with olive oil and sea salt and serve with the rest of the ingredients. Excellent with an icy glass of white wine/spring water with lemon/afternoon siesta.

Double marrow pasta

Scrumptious Summertime – Enjoy!

Kids Forage and Harvest Morning – Pizza!

Last Saturday we had such a fun laughter filled Kids Forage and Harvest morning!

Our lovely group of excited kids collected wild herbs, edible flowers and garden veg to create and eat PIZZA!

And yes, moms and dads, grannies and grandpa’s – they ate ALL THEIR VEG UP!!!

The mothers who were there were all very pleased with this and asked when the next one was…. It’s this coming Saturday the 9th of November!

Here are some highlights from our morning:

Kids foraging courseWere off!

Kids Foraging coursePicking carrots

Kids forage morningBella the pig!

Kids forage and Harvest morningChecking the goods

Farm animalsFarm animals!

Kids Forgae and Harvest morningRinsing the flowers

Carrot manMr Carrot Man

Kids Forage and HarvestCreating edible masterpieces

Kids forage and harvest courseYum!

Foraged and harvested pizzaSo tasty!

Kids forage and harvest morningSay cheese!

Hope you can join us at our next exciting morning 🙂

Veggies and Composting in Spring

We have been working hard in our veggie gardens, getting them looking beautiful for our Forage, Harvest and Feast courses and as tasty as possible for us to eat from everyday – its a real working garden. Baby girl knows that if she find a packet and puts on her boots, she can get a tasty snack. “Peas!” she shouts, banging on the door. Its one of her first words. “More!” is another one.ImageSnack time!CompostHere is our rich, warm compost pile. When it gets turned over, you can see the steam billowing out.

Its beautiful. But its hard work. It’s really like having another pet.

You have to feed it and make sure it doesn’t get too hot or too cold and that it gets enough nutrients and oxygen. The optimum temperature for a compost pile is about 60 degrees so that the pathogens and weed seeds are inactivated. It gets nice and cosy like this because of all the microorganisms eating away at the degradable matter. Id love to finish off a stew or even a pot of rice in there one day!

But if you have a big old dry compost heap, it can even catch on fire in hot weather – seriously.

You can read all about it here. If you want something cute on compost Q and A, then check this out.

If it gets too cold, it will slow down the composting process and stop it doing its job. If it gets too hot, the poor little microbes die. We definitely don’t want that to happen, so we have to turn over the compost pile regularly. And if  the compost doesn’t get enough nutrients or air it wont work either.

I could go on for ever. There is so much more. But I don’t want to bore you with a big pile of know-you-know-what.

CabbagesPretty maids, I mean cabbages, all in a row

Broad beans and leeksBroad beans and Leeks

Veggie gardenCalendula, Lavender, Artemesia, Onions, Thyme, Lemon Pelargonium and Rosemary.

ArtichokesThe first beautiful Artichokes of the season

Veggie gardenCalendula, Borage, black Mustard and Swiss Chard

How many recipes have you got in your head now? I just have to see plants, any edible plants, and my mouth starts drooling with all the recipes going through my mind. You know the Matrix movie with all those green numbers and letters whizzing down the screen? It’s like that in my mind, except those numbers are all plant combos and recipes. Totally normal.

Protea cyneroidesI’ll end off with a photo of our stunning King Protea which flowers at the same time every year without fail, heralding the beginning of Spring.

Happy gardening!

Kids Forage and Harvest Morning

Last week we had two brilliant Kids Forage mornings.

Forage and Harvest classroomJust do the math:

Kids + school holidays + baskets + edible flowers & wild herbs + farm animals + an awesome playground + baking + paper + crayons

= A bunch of happy kids, floral & wild herb scones with lashings of jam and cream, fynbos iced tea, art, shrieks of laughter, new friends, plant knowledge, full tummies and
a Wild Fun Time!

Check it out:

Tasting spekboomDaring each other to eat the Spekboom leaves

Picking and tasting Borage flowersTasting Borage flowers

Chatting along the walkDiscussing the merits of foraged wild edibles versus harvested crops. Or how mushy the mud is.

Peppermint PelargoniumPeppermint Pelargonium …”It tastes like bubblegum!”

Bella the pigMeeting Bella the pig

GoatsJust kidding around

Washing the flowersWashing flowersWashing the flowers and wild herbs

Drying the flowersThen spinning them dry

choppingChop chop

Making sconesMaking the scones

Tasting the scone doughQuality control tasting

In the playgroundIn the playgroundIn the playgroundHaving fun in the playground

Time for scones!Scones are ready!

Flower and wild herb scones with cfeam and jamYummy

Tucking into sconesYummy

Flower sconesIn my

Flower scones with jam and creamTummy!

plant drawingArt classBird drawingProud little artistAnd such creative artists!

Thank you to all the lovely children and their wonderful parents for bringing them for the fun filled morning.

Next time we will be making pizza!

Hope to see all those who who could not make it at one of the next Kids Forage Mornings.

Roots and shoots

I was in the garden this morning, having a dreamy moment, doing the fun part I like best in veggie gardening which is the harvesting. As I was pulling beetroot out of the ground, two majestic cranes flew overhead. “Aaah.” I thought. “This must be SO symbolic!” A thin dark ribbon floated down from one of the cranes. In slow motion I watched as the wind changed and it headed in my direction.  Wake up and smell the organic fair trade coffee, hippy-girl, there is now bird poo in your hair. I took it as a good sign.  And also as a sign to wash my hair.

Beetroots are one of my favorite  winter roots , this purplish red veg is good for your everything. Read about it here

A lot of people forget all about the beetroots humble leaves. The leaves actually have more nutrients than the root. They are they same family as chard and spinach leaves, rich in chlorophyll, protein, calcium, magnesium, copper, sodium,fiber, beta carotene and vitamins A, B and C. They are slightly more bitter tasting than spinach, but nothing a bit of nutmeg and white sauce can’t sort out, or a crumble of feta on some fresh leaves in a salad.

There are endless recipes for beetroot. Winners in our family include beetroot cake (substitute carrots for beetroot  in a carrot cake recipe) with a cream-cheese icing, roasted beetroot with honey and fennel seed, beetroot leaf lasagna, homemade beetroot pizza – leaves and sliced root with mozzarella and fresh thyme, grated beetroot in coleslaw, oh I could go on for days. But don’t forget beetroot juice with ginger. carrot and apple. Or beetroot brownies, frozen yoghurt beetroot popsicle for kids, beetroot and goats cheese salad. OK I’ll stop now. Beetroot soup with Greek yoghurt. The end.

This UK website called Love Beetroot is all about beetroot (obviously) and has a great list of all these amazing fun facts on beetroot.

Our lovely friend was even growing them on a roof garden in the city.

Having a vegetable garden is kind of like that moment where you get pins and needles really badly in your legs just as your baby wakes up crying upstairs. You know its going to be tough, and you will probably have to get down on your hands and knees for part of the way, but you know the rewards are going to be amazing:  A happy baby and fresh organic produce. Those two things always make me smile. And a happy baby that eats your homegrown beetroot? You just cant beet that 🙂

Beetroots in Good Hope Gardens