Category: Planting

Veggie Garden Club – August

At our latest veggie garden club meeting, we focused on soil, wicking beds and spring planting.

Each meeting is held at a different garden and this time we were kindly hosted by Pete and Germain of the Urban Farmers.

Urban Farmers container gardens

Lettuce growing in recycled plastic bottles.

Geodome chicken coop

The Urban Farmers brilliant geodome chicken coop.

Spring seedlings

Their seedlings for spring.

We started off the meeting by discussing what we will all be planting for our Spring gardens. And of course the essential baboon proofing – a lot of gardens have been raided recently and there is a great need to find low cost materials to create a secure cage system.

A few very interesting conversations included

  • Shade effects on growth of plants (inhibits growth)
  • Plant memory. If you plant your Spring veg too soon, they will get confused with the changing weather (hot and cold spells) leading up to consistent warm Spring weather. They will count the hot and cold conditions as seasonal changes and you will end up with premature bolting (going to seed).
  • Nitrogen needed in the soil for onions. Added to the soil this will help your onion crop grow bigger and faster and generally good for promoting leafy greens.
  • Soil improvement. For sandy coastal dune soil one should add compost (balance the alkalinity) and for sandy mountain soil one should add kaolin (balance the acidity) Getting the PH balance right is best for optimum growth. You can get a little PH soil testing kit to see how your soil is doing.
  • Compost. To make an excellent quality compost, make a huge pile of 50% horse manure and/or chicken manure and 50% straw.Cover with a plastic sheet and in 4-6 months time you will have a beautiful pile of ready to use compost.

Then Pete gave a great show and tell on wicking beds.

Here is a diagram for those of you unfamiliar with these water-wise container gardens, .

wicking bed image

Wicking bed

Wicking bed in the making…plastic lining attached.

square foot garden

Square foot gardening…seedlings planted up and ready to grow.

Franz suggested planting 16 lettuce plants in one square which would give yout 6 – 8 weeks of harvesting lettuce from your wicking bed garden, giving them space to grow as you harvest.

Wicking beds

Pete showed us some of the containers in the process of being built and told us how they work, above he is describing the 16 squares to plant in.If you are interested in these fantastic units for growing in but are not great with tools, you can contact them on their website or find them on their Facebook page to order one.

Pallet garden

There are many different sizes to choose from. For a mini version using the same capillary action they use plastic bottles cut in half and inverted as a mini wicking system, lined up in a neat pallet-shelf vertical garden.

wself watering wicking garden

The same idea can also be used in the ground.

And if you use the same ratio of 30cm of soil (1/3 compost, 1/3 vermiculite. 1/3 peat moss) under 6 cm of mulch in a normal garden bed, you would also have a great water wise garden and only need to do a long deep watering once a week.

Start with the basics and you can grow anything. Its all about your soil. 

Franz Muhl’s Vegetable seed sowing chart for the Cape Peninsula in August:

X – Optimal sowing time

x – Possible, depending on the seasonal weather

o -In the greenhouse or similar warm space

(D)irect or (T)ransplant * Final spacing-cm * Germination time-days * Maturation time-weeks * Heavy/Mod/Light feeder

Baby marrow – xxx       

D                   60-80 cm                 7-14days                     6weeks                               MF

Basil – ooo

T or D            20-30cm                  7-14days                     8-10weeks                          MF

Beetroot – xxx              

D                   8-12cm                    7-14days                     8-9weeks                            HF

Brinjal – ooo                

T                   40-50cm                  14-20days                    8-10weeks                          HF

Broccoli – xxxx             

T or D            30-40cm                  5-10days                     8-9weeks                            HF

Cabbage – xxxx           

T or D            40-50cm                  5-10days                     8-9weeks                             HF

Cauliflower – xxXX       

T or D            40-50cm                  5-10days                      8-10weeks                          HF

Carrot – xxXX              

D                    4-7cm                      7-10days                      8-10weeks                          LF

Celery – ooxx             

T                     30-40cm                  10-18days                    12-14weeks                        HF

Cucumber – xxxx        

D                     40-50cm                  7-14days                      8-10weeks                         MF

Kale – xxxx                 

T or D             40-50cm                   5-10days                      6-8weeks                           HF

Leek – xxxx                

T                     10-15cm                   6-14days                      8-10weeks                          MF

Lettuce – xxXX           

T or D             25-35cm                   3-7days                         8-10weeks                         LF

Pea – XXXX               

D                     4-5cm                       5-10days                       8-10weeks                         LF

Peppers – ooo          

T                     30-40cm                   14-20days                     9-11weeks                         HF

Potato – XXXX           

D                     30-40cm                   –                                    11-14weeks                       MF

Radish – XXXX          

D                     3-8cm                        3-5days                         3-4weeks                           HF         

Spring onion – xxXX   

T                    4-8cm                        6-14days                       8-10weeks                         LF

Squash – xxx             

D                    80-100cm                  7-14days                       2-15weeks                          MF                

Swiss chard – xxXX   

T or D             25-35cm                    7-14days                       8-10weeks                          MF      

Tomato – oooo         

T                     40-50cm                    5-10days                       7-10weeks                          MF

Happy planting everyone – Spring is almost here!

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Seed ’em and reap.

Seeds are life.

The wondrous cycle from seed to plant, flower to fruit and back to seed.

Lets throw a few highlighted words out there for you. You probably know them all. If not, do a bit of research. Copy and paste them into Google search, chat to friends, read some books. Come up with your own thoughts on the matter.

I’m not going to write about GMO and its promotion in South Africa through the Green Revolution, the world of Biopiracy and its effects on Indigenous livelihoods, or the importance of Seed Sovereignty.

But I am going to share some of the enjoyment we experience from the seed cycle.

SEEDS

SeedsSeeds – begged, borrowed, bought or grown.

SeedsHomegrown seeds

SEEDLINGS

SeedlingsLettuce seedlings in the front row

PLANTS

Lettuce plantsSeedlings in the ground.

LettuceRenegade lettuce growing in the cracks. Saving this hero’s seed for sure.

Manchester turnipSelf seeded Manchester turnip in the lettuce bed.

CorianderCoriander grown from our own seed for about 4 years now.

Cucumber plantsCucumber plants – flowers have started.

FLOWERS

SunflowersSunflower

Pea flowersPea flowers

tomato flowersBaby tomato flowers

marrow flowersMarrow flowers developing into fruit.

FRUIT

Picking tomatoesPicking the fruits of our labour – tomato varieties.

MarrowMarrow

Rainbow radishesRainbow radishes

CucumbersCucumbers

Supper ingredientsSupper ingredients

Garden harvestGarden harvest

FOOD

Tomatoes and peppers for roastingTomatoes and peppers ready for roasting

Fresh veg and homemade pastaFresh veg and homemade pasta

Veg wrapsVeg wraps

Garden saladRadish salad

Tomato snacksSummer tomato snacks

Seared goat and garden veg saladSeared goat and garden veg salad

Garden veg seed savingMaking supper and saving seeds along the way.

and back to…SEEDS

SunflowersSunflowers seeds.

Sorting chive seedsChive seeds.

Shelling pea seedsPea seeds.

Radish seedRadish seeds.

Red clover seedsDecanting red clover seeds into jars.

SeedsAnd repeat.

Plants want to grow. We need to eat. So….

Grow food

And if you don’t have a spot of soil to grow in – support your local farmer.

Happy healthy eating everyone!

Veggie Garden Club

Two weekends ago we had our very first Veggie Garden Club meeting here at Good Hope Gardens Nursery. The goal is to come together as growers from the area and to discuss ideas, problems we encounter in our gardens, share seeds and recipes. There are a lot of food producers locally as well as those who would like to learn, and I thought it would be great if we could get together and share knowledge and inspiration. We had a nice turnout for the first meeting, some people could not make it, but we filled the big wooden table in the Forage and Harvest classroom where the first meeting was held. The meetings will happen once a month at different gardens each time. Lucky for us, Kate Higgs – a fantastic photographer – joined our group and quietly took these beautiful photos.

There were a few things from the garden on the table for inspiration/to munch on.

Organic veg inspiration

Organic bananas

Rainbow radishes

Sweet potatoes

The group members varied from expert experienced permaculturists to those that had not yet started a veggie garden. Everyone had something interesting to contribute whether it was questions, answers, ideas, seeds or recipes.

Deep South Veggie Garden Club

Topics I had in mind that I wanted to cover were:

Crops, seeds, crop rotation and maintenance.

Topics that were discussed over the one and a half hours:

  • Baboons: Baboons are one of the biggest problem a food gardener faces in our area. We spoke about how to baboon proof your garden, what materials to use (check out your local dump) and how to build the structures like geodomes, cages and fencing.Deep South Veggie Garden Club
  • Veg planting guide: A Western Cape planting guide was handed around and we looked at what would work specifically in our area, what seeds we should be planting into the ground, what seedlings we should be planting and what to plant into trays. Deep South Veggie Garden Club
  • Hints and tips: The more experienced growers shared some hints and tips:
  1. Carrots and coriander need 8 days to germinate – after planting directly into the ground, cover with wet newspaper or hessian and keep moist for 7 days. On the 8th day, remove the cover and hope for a sunny day…..you will find the seeds have germinated and the weeds will have grown long, thin and white along the ground, searching for the sun. Once the cover is removed, the sun will scorch these white weeds, leaving you with only what you want in the bed.
  2. Wild rocket VS normal rocket – Wild rocket likes shade in late summer, it doesn’t get bitter, it self seeds easily and has smaller leaves. Normal rocket is a heavy feeder and would prefer to grow individually throughout your garden so scatter them around rather than plant a patch of them.
  3. The taste of herbs are diminished by the shade so rather plant in a sunny spot.
  4. For sweet carrots you need lots of minerals in the soil so add some phosphorus and potassium for tastier carrots.

Deep South Veggie Garden Club

  • We touched on seed saving, how to harvest seeds, how to store them and who had seeds to share.

Seed saving

  • Soil improvement – in our area the soil is very sandy. Sandy soil is good for drainage but needs to be enriched. We spoke about what to add to your soil. Get some horse manure from your local stables and mix with straw, Keep it wet and covered and spread over the sandy soil. Deep South Veggie Garden Club
  • MULCH MULCH MULCH. Watch Back to Eden for information on why mulch is so great for your garden. If you are not religious and can get past the biblical references, stick with it to watch and see how much sense the “forest floor” theory makes. Also invest/borrow or hire a wood chipper to chip up whole trees (branches and leaves included) or branches that need pruning in your garden. You can also get wood chips from your local dump or recycling center. Mulch should be about 10-15cm deep on your beds.Deep South Veggie Garden Club
  • We had a little talk and diagram drawn out for us by Pete explaining how wicking beds work. These container beds are about 120cm wide made from plastic containers or lined pallets. They have water and solid objects like rocks and bottles in the bottom layer, covered by biddem cloth. Next is a 30cm layer of compost followed by 6cm of wood chip. The is an inlet pipe that leads down to the water tank and feeds the plants through capillary action, so you don’t water the plants, just very occasionally top up the tank. Also an outlet pipe for overflow. Great for those with small gardens, or wanting to grow veg if you only have a courtyard or balcony. Pete makes these to order if you are not a great with tools.Wicking bed talk and diagram
  • We debated drip irrigation VS sprinkler/hose watering. Deep South Veggie Garden Club
  • Living near the Atlantic ocean we all have access to lots of seaweed. We spoke about using seaweed as a mulch or fertilizer. If you use undiluted seaweed your spinach can become more salty as a high content of salt in the soil will be absorbed by leafy greens.Deep South Veggie Garden Club
  • Hugelkultur was discussed and how we could/have implemented this in our own gardens. Deep South Veggie Garden Club
  • We shared recipes for leaves of the sweet potato and butternut. The first three shiny new leaves on a sweet potato vine can be used like spinach. Butternut and pumpkin leaves can be cooked with ground up raw peanuts in a coconut sauce and served on rice.Deep South Veggie Garden Club
  • A few of us had brought along some seeds to share – there was excitement and sparkling eyes as the seeds were passed around and we felt a bit like kids in a sweet shop.Radish seeds

What we should be planting now:

Seed Sowing Chart details by Franz Muhl.

Directly into the ground:

Beetroot. Final spacing: 8-12cm. Germination time: 7-14 days. Maturation time: 8-9weeks. Heavy feeder.

   Radishes. Final spacing: 3-8cm. Germination time: 3-5days. Maturation time: 3-4weeks. Heavy feeder.

Carrots: Final spacing: 4-7cm. Germination time: 7-10 days. Maturation time: 8-10weeks. Light feeder.

  Lettuce. Final spacing: 25-35cm. Germination time: 3-7days. Maturation time: 8-10weeks. Light feeder.

  Coriander. Final spacing: 1cm. Germination time: 7days. Maturation time: 3-5weeks. Medium feeder.

Garlic. Final spacing: 8-12cm. Heavy feeder.

Peas. Final spacing: 4-5cm. Germination time: 5-10days. Maturation time: 8-10weeks. Light feeder.

You can also direct seed turnips, nasturtiums, swiss chard and kale.

Into seed trays:

Onions. Final spacing: 10-15cm. Germination time: 6-14days. Medium feeder.

Spring onions. Final spacing: 4-8cm. Germination time: 6-14days. Maturation time: 8-10weeks. Light feeder.

Kale: Final spacing: 40-50cm. Germination time: 5-10days. Maturation time: 6-10weeks. Heavy feeder.

Swiss chard. Final spacing: 25-35cm. Germination time: 7-14days. Maturation time: 8-10weeks. Medium feeder.

You can also plant lettuce into trays.

Seedlings into the grounds:

Broccoli. Final spacing: 30-40cm. Germination time: 5-10days. Maturation time: 8-9weeks. Heavy feeder.

For organic seedling, Harts Nursery is a great place to buy from.

So maybe if you live in the Deep South you will be tempted to join us next month or if you dont live in the area, you will be motivated to start your own veggie garden club. As you know, food is kind of important to us humans – we should all learn how to grow our own and teach our children at the same time.

Happy planting and happy eating!

 

Veggies and Composting in Spring

We have been working hard in our veggie gardens, getting them looking beautiful for our Forage, Harvest and Feast courses and as tasty as possible for us to eat from everyday – its a real working garden. Baby girl knows that if she find a packet and puts on her boots, she can get a tasty snack. “Peas!” she shouts, banging on the door. Its one of her first words. “More!” is another one.ImageSnack time!CompostHere is our rich, warm compost pile. When it gets turned over, you can see the steam billowing out.

Its beautiful. But its hard work. It’s really like having another pet.

You have to feed it and make sure it doesn’t get too hot or too cold and that it gets enough nutrients and oxygen. The optimum temperature for a compost pile is about 60 degrees so that the pathogens and weed seeds are inactivated. It gets nice and cosy like this because of all the microorganisms eating away at the degradable matter. Id love to finish off a stew or even a pot of rice in there one day!

But if you have a big old dry compost heap, it can even catch on fire in hot weather – seriously.

You can read all about it here. If you want something cute on compost Q and A, then check this out.

If it gets too cold, it will slow down the composting process and stop it doing its job. If it gets too hot, the poor little microbes die. We definitely don’t want that to happen, so we have to turn over the compost pile regularly. And if  the compost doesn’t get enough nutrients or air it wont work either.

I could go on for ever. There is so much more. But I don’t want to bore you with a big pile of know-you-know-what.

CabbagesPretty maids, I mean cabbages, all in a row

Broad beans and leeksBroad beans and Leeks

Veggie gardenCalendula, Lavender, Artemesia, Onions, Thyme, Lemon Pelargonium and Rosemary.

ArtichokesThe first beautiful Artichokes of the season

Veggie gardenCalendula, Borage, black Mustard and Swiss Chard

How many recipes have you got in your head now? I just have to see plants, any edible plants, and my mouth starts drooling with all the recipes going through my mind. You know the Matrix movie with all those green numbers and letters whizzing down the screen? It’s like that in my mind, except those numbers are all plant combos and recipes. Totally normal.

Protea cyneroidesI’ll end off with a photo of our stunning King Protea which flowers at the same time every year without fail, heralding the beginning of Spring.

Happy gardening!

Spring Sale and the Indigenous Spring Garden Competition winners

On the 14th of September we had a fantastic Spring Sale here at the nursery. The weather really behaved for us and the nursery was looking beautiful.

Spring fynbos displayWe had the Indigenous Spring Garden Competition prize-giving in the court yard…

Kids category winnersEli Amery won the online junior photo entry – plant photo entitled “Indigenous is fun” and won a
R150 voucher from La Chatelaine
and a R100 gift voucher from Good Hope Gardens Nursery
.

Roxi and Skyla Hoets-Turner won the most creative junior indigenous garden and won a
Playground Party Venue voucher for 3hours valued at R750 from Good Hope Gardens Nursery
and a cute Dreamweavers kids wooden chair.

The winners for the Online photo entry – plant photo entitled “Indigenous beauty” could unfortunately not make it, but the winners were
Eva van Belle won first place – an Ilundi hand stitched leather I-pad case valued at R450
and Rayne Eaton in Second place – winning a R250 meal voucher from Decks restaurant in Kommetjie

The most creative small space indigenous garden winners were
Rosemary Barker in first place – who won a meal voucher from The
Annex for a two course meal for two people

Rosemary Barker
Mrs E van der Vyver in second place – winning a GHGN 1hour Guided Fynbos Walk for four people, valued at R350Mrs E van der Vyver
Third place went to Greg Nicolson who won a R200 Good Hope Gardens Nursery voucher but he was in Madagascar at the time of the prize giving
.

Most diverse large indigenous garden winners were:
First place – a Garden clean-up from Good Hope Gardens Landscaping, valued at R1000 was won by Susan Thirion

Susan Thirion
Allison James won second place winning this lovely 1.5m long latte bench from The Pole Yard valued at R550

The Pole Yard bench
And Juliette de Combes came in third place  winning a R250 meal voucher for The Meeting Place in Simonstown

Juliette de Combes

The rest of the day was filled with Flowers, Fynbos and Fun….

RetailTaking advantage of the wide selection of indigenous plants all on sale in the retail.

Ismail Smiths curryDelicious food!

Shady seatingHaving fun in the shady seating area.

Car boot saleLooking for bargains at the car boot sale.

Lemon Tart and cappuccinoThe most amazing lemon tart and cappuccino by Jaaqui

PlaygroundRelaxing in the playground.

A fun day for all! A huge hanks to all our prize sponsors and to all those who came and supported us. Lets do it again next year!

CliviaHappy Spring everyone!!!!!

Roots and shoots

I was in the garden this morning, having a dreamy moment, doing the fun part I like best in veggie gardening which is the harvesting. As I was pulling beetroot out of the ground, two majestic cranes flew overhead. “Aaah.” I thought. “This must be SO symbolic!” A thin dark ribbon floated down from one of the cranes. In slow motion I watched as the wind changed and it headed in my direction.  Wake up and smell the organic fair trade coffee, hippy-girl, there is now bird poo in your hair. I took it as a good sign.  And also as a sign to wash my hair.

Beetroots are one of my favorite  winter roots , this purplish red veg is good for your everything. Read about it here

A lot of people forget all about the beetroots humble leaves. The leaves actually have more nutrients than the root. They are they same family as chard and spinach leaves, rich in chlorophyll, protein, calcium, magnesium, copper, sodium,fiber, beta carotene and vitamins A, B and C. They are slightly more bitter tasting than spinach, but nothing a bit of nutmeg and white sauce can’t sort out, or a crumble of feta on some fresh leaves in a salad.

There are endless recipes for beetroot. Winners in our family include beetroot cake (substitute carrots for beetroot  in a carrot cake recipe) with a cream-cheese icing, roasted beetroot with honey and fennel seed, beetroot leaf lasagna, homemade beetroot pizza – leaves and sliced root with mozzarella and fresh thyme, grated beetroot in coleslaw, oh I could go on for days. But don’t forget beetroot juice with ginger. carrot and apple. Or beetroot brownies, frozen yoghurt beetroot popsicle for kids, beetroot and goats cheese salad. OK I’ll stop now. Beetroot soup with Greek yoghurt. The end.

This UK website called Love Beetroot is all about beetroot (obviously) and has a great list of all these amazing fun facts on beetroot.

Our lovely friend was even growing them on a roof garden in the city.

Having a vegetable garden is kind of like that moment where you get pins and needles really badly in your legs just as your baby wakes up crying upstairs. You know its going to be tough, and you will probably have to get down on your hands and knees for part of the way, but you know the rewards are going to be amazing:  A happy baby and fresh organic produce. Those two things always make me smile. And a happy baby that eats your homegrown beetroot? You just cant beet that 🙂

Beetroots in Good Hope Gardens

Winter photo haikus

For a change in rhythm, I decided to describe these winter photos of the nursery in Haiku form. They are not very good, possibly a bit cheesy, but I definitely had fun writing them!

Here are some haikus about nature. This blog has a new haiku every day. This one shows kids how to write haikus. And these are a few funny haikus.

Give it a go – its relaxing and fun and a perfect thing to do in your garden with a cup of tea on a sunny Sunday morning.

Let the sun shine down

on Knippophia praecox

glowing and greeting.

Image

Aloe aloe kids

wooden park with swings and things

climb and laugh and play

Image

A bird made of rust

in a nest of succulents

outside the office.

IMG_20130710_221850

A. ciliaris

in flower as a mauve star

so good in my tea

IMG_20130710_222200

Walk in and see us

Fall in love with our colours

dancing in the breeze

Image

Pathways to lead you

through inspiration and dreams

your garden design.

Image

Cool shady seating

a picnic in the shadows

rest your weary feet

Image

House under mountains

nurturing baby seedlings

till we can sell them

Image

Succulent koppie

kom kuier in this bathroom

don’t forget to flush

IMG_20130710_231325

Three white goats looking

don’t climb into my garden

but thanks for your milk

IMG_20130710_232123

The Aloe ferox

so medicinally great

garden pharmacy

IMG_20130710_232426

Happy planting from

Good Hope Gardens Nursery

hope to see you soon

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