Category: sustainable foraging

Goodbye Coastal Foraging courses, see you in November!

On a blustery, grey skied morning, our final group gathered at the beach for the last coastal forage of the season.

All our forages are run according to the season, and this one has sadly come to a close for now, but don’t worry – we will be resuming the coastal forages in November!

Reasoning for our seasonal coastal foraging includes: the bitter cold winds and weather at the beach in the colder months,big swells making for dangerous foraging close to the tide line and bigger wave action leading to less seaweed in the rock pools through bashing of the algae and sweeping organisms out of the pools.

If the hold-fast or roots of these washed-away seaweeds remain on the rocks, they will regrow in Spring,Like plants, there are also annual and perennial seaweeds, so in winter some will die off and only grow again in Spring.We give them this break to regenerate and from late spring to early summer is the time when all seaweeds are highest in nutrients with their succulent new growth, bursting with vital vitamins and minerals, highly beneficial for your health.

Here are some beautiful photos taken at our last coastal forage by the very talented Sitaara Stodel.

Coastal Foraging Cape Town

Coastal Foraging South Africa

Coastal Foraging

Coastal foraging Cape Town

Porphyra capensis

Coastal Foraging Cape Town

Seaweed coastal foraging

Coastal Foraging

Coastal Foraging Cape Town

Coastal Foraging - Good Hope Gardens Nursery

Edible seaweed and shellfish

Coastal Foraging

Dead mans fingers

Coastal Foraging South Africa

Coastal Foraging

Coastal Foraging

Kelp

Organic Veg - Forage Harvest Feast

Edible seaweed

Coastal Foraging course Cape Town

Edible sea lettuce seaweed

Coastal Foraging with seaweeds

Seaweed salad

Cooking with seaweed

Seaweed face mask

Seaweed face mask

Kelp sushi rolls

Coastal Foraging Course

Seaweed coleslaw

Mussel pot with tomatoes and thyme

Coastal Foraging cooking course

Kelp and cocoa icecream

Up next – news of Fynbos Feast events, Veld and Sea inspired pop-up dinners and the upcoming Fynbos Foraging courses dates. Watch this space!

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Coastal foraging photos and course dates.

Last month we had a fantastic day of discovering, tasting, experiencing and feasting. We were lucky to forage at new moon  on a very low tide with a very small swell, allowing us maximum exploring time in the inter-tidal rock pools at Scarborough beach.  A huge thanks to Jean-michel Maurel for these beautiful images he captured on the day.

Coastal foraging at Scarborough beach

Seaweed reflecting in the rockpool

Coastal Foraging in Cape Town

Coastal foraging

Coastal foraging - seaweed

Mussels

Coastal foraging

Dead mans fingers - seaweed

Collecting mussels

Scarborough waves

Coastal foraging in the Cape

Coastal foraging course

Edible seaweed - coastal foraging

Beach cottage

Edible seaweeds - coastal foraging course

Preparing edible seaweed

Kelp and tomato salad

Edible seaweed meals

Garden art

Coastal foraging lunch

Mussel pot - coastal foraging

Coastal foraged ingredients in our delicious lunch

Forage Harvest Feast

Kelp and cocoa ice cream with candied kelp and almonds

Please join us on one of our LAST COURSES FOR THE SEASON! Don’t miss out – it really is as exciting and delicious as it looks…

Saturday the 21st of March – 9am-1pm

Saturday the 4th of April – 9am-1pm

*Possibility of a May date TBC

For info or to book please contact roushanna@hotmail.com

Why should people learn to forage?

Why should people learn to forage?

Wild food foraging

I have been asked this a lot lately. I have tossed this question around in my mind, thought about the positive and the negative views of foraging, the realistic need for survival skills, the idealistic romantic dreams of gathering your own wild food and the sustainable issues in between. So far, I have come up with this.

I think there are two parts to this question – 1. Why should people LEARN to forage and 2. Why should people learn to FORAGE

The first question is as important as the second.

Its is a skill that you have to learn by the physical act of learning from someone with experience, it’s not just a skill you can learn off the internet or read in a book. The tradition of passing down the knowledge of foraging is rare in our modern-day world, yet for most of our human existence we have sustained ourselves through this skill. Without learning, foraging can be deadly dangerous – if you can’t positively ID the plant you want to forage, you could get seriously poisoned. Since the rising trend of foraging, there have been numerous cases of food poisoning and even deaths. You have to know what time of year to harvest, what part of the plant to eat, how much to pick and how exactly to prepare it. Where you are foraging from is very important as you are not allowed to forage on private land or nature reserves, and should be aware of pollutants. Sustainability plays a huge role when foraging become fashionable. Lets face it, if everyone started foraging again, it would be detrimental to our environment by threatening its biodiversity and by unintentional disturbance to its ecosystem. That’s why we encourage people on our foraging courses to plant indigenous edibles into their gardens for a more sustainable and practical solution : backyard foraging. Our indigenous plants are more suited to this harsh African climate than regular fruit and veg anyway and should definitely be included into all food gardens. A lot of our Indigenous berry bushes and fruit trees make great security hedges and windbreaks and the wide variety of perennial wild herbs are pretty much maintenance-free once established.

Indigenous herbs

The second question is a bit more personal…why do I think people should forage once they have learnt?

Its delicious, its nutritious, it’s a free form of clean, organic local food. I love the different range of wild flavours, the excitement as the season finally nears a favourite wild edibles time for harvesting, experimenting with new recipes and the delight in others enjoying the meal. Plant study is an ongoing love affair that never ends – the more you learn, the more there is to learn. There are so many wonderful stories, myths and muthi, power and traditions, behind our plants. Its empowering to have the knowledge to be able to feed yourself. It’s a joyous celebration of connecting with nature, understanding the seasons, being in touch with the tides and the moon phases. It’s a wonderful gift to be able to teach your children. Its indigenous food revival!

Foraged lunch at Good Hope Gardens Nursery