Category: Vegetables

Forage Harvest feast – August

This weekend we held one of the last Forage Harvest Feast fynbos forages of the season with amazing people, beautiful weather and delicious food.

Reconnecting with our food and gaining knowledge about our edible Indigenous landscape evoked interesting conversation that flowed around the like minded crowd.

Coleonema oatcakes and Salvia goats cheese

Coleonema “confetti bush” oatcakes and Salvia goats cheese

Buchu brandy

Buchu brandy

The forage classrooms table

The forage classroom.

Forage Harvest Feast

Washing and sorting the forage and harvested goods.

Edible flowers

Edible flower power.

Forage and Harvest course

Sorting the harvest.

Reconnecting to your food

Slow Food – the sweet life.

Wild herb cheeses

Wild herb cheeses

CWild food community meals

Making rainbow salads.

Wild garlic rolls

Wild garlic rolls.

Cooking lunch at Forage Harvest Feast

Cooking up a storm.

Wild food Feast

Feast!

Honeybush and lemon Pelargonium cupcakes

Honeybush and lemon Pelargonium cupcakes.

If you would like to join us on our last Forage Harvest Feast of the season, or bring your kids to join our Kids Forage and Harvest mornings, contact us soon as spaces are filling up quickly.

Forage Harvest Feast

September the 13th – Saturday from 10am-2pm

Kids Forage and Harvest mornings

Saturday 27th of September 10am – 12pm PIZZA
Monday  29th of September 2pm – 4pm PIZZA
Thursday 2nd of October 2pm – 4pm SCONES
Saturday 4th of October 10am – 12pm SCONES

For more info and to book please email roushanna@hotmail.com

 

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Veggie Garden Club – August

At our latest veggie garden club meeting, we focused on soil, wicking beds and spring planting.

Each meeting is held at a different garden and this time we were kindly hosted by Pete and Germain of the Urban Farmers.

Urban Farmers container gardens

Lettuce growing in recycled plastic bottles.

Geodome chicken coop

The Urban Farmers brilliant geodome chicken coop.

Spring seedlings

Their seedlings for spring.

We started off the meeting by discussing what we will all be planting for our Spring gardens. And of course the essential baboon proofing – a lot of gardens have been raided recently and there is a great need to find low cost materials to create a secure cage system.

A few very interesting conversations included

  • Shade effects on growth of plants (inhibits growth)
  • Plant memory. If you plant your Spring veg too soon, they will get confused with the changing weather (hot and cold spells) leading up to consistent warm Spring weather. They will count the hot and cold conditions as seasonal changes and you will end up with premature bolting (going to seed).
  • Nitrogen needed in the soil for onions. Added to the soil this will help your onion crop grow bigger and faster and generally good for promoting leafy greens.
  • Soil improvement. For sandy coastal dune soil one should add compost (balance the alkalinity) and for sandy mountain soil one should add kaolin (balance the acidity) Getting the PH balance right is best for optimum growth. You can get a little PH soil testing kit to see how your soil is doing.
  • Compost. To make an excellent quality compost, make a huge pile of 50% horse manure and/or chicken manure and 50% straw.Cover with a plastic sheet and in 4-6 months time you will have a beautiful pile of ready to use compost.

Then Pete gave a great show and tell on wicking beds.

Here is a diagram for those of you unfamiliar with these water-wise container gardens, .

wicking bed image

Wicking bed

Wicking bed in the making…plastic lining attached.

square foot garden

Square foot gardening…seedlings planted up and ready to grow.

Franz suggested planting 16 lettuce plants in one square which would give yout 6 – 8 weeks of harvesting lettuce from your wicking bed garden, giving them space to grow as you harvest.

Wicking beds

Pete showed us some of the containers in the process of being built and told us how they work, above he is describing the 16 squares to plant in.If you are interested in these fantastic units for growing in but are not great with tools, you can contact them on their website or find them on their Facebook page to order one.

Pallet garden

There are many different sizes to choose from. For a mini version using the same capillary action they use plastic bottles cut in half and inverted as a mini wicking system, lined up in a neat pallet-shelf vertical garden.

wself watering wicking garden

The same idea can also be used in the ground.

And if you use the same ratio of 30cm of soil (1/3 compost, 1/3 vermiculite. 1/3 peat moss) under 6 cm of mulch in a normal garden bed, you would also have a great water wise garden and only need to do a long deep watering once a week.

Start with the basics and you can grow anything. Its all about your soil. 

Franz Muhl’s Vegetable seed sowing chart for the Cape Peninsula in August:

X – Optimal sowing time

x – Possible, depending on the seasonal weather

o -In the greenhouse or similar warm space

(D)irect or (T)ransplant * Final spacing-cm * Germination time-days * Maturation time-weeks * Heavy/Mod/Light feeder

Baby marrow – xxx       

D                   60-80 cm                 7-14days                     6weeks                               MF

Basil – ooo

T or D            20-30cm                  7-14days                     8-10weeks                          MF

Beetroot – xxx              

D                   8-12cm                    7-14days                     8-9weeks                            HF

Brinjal – ooo                

T                   40-50cm                  14-20days                    8-10weeks                          HF

Broccoli – xxxx             

T or D            30-40cm                  5-10days                     8-9weeks                            HF

Cabbage – xxxx           

T or D            40-50cm                  5-10days                     8-9weeks                             HF

Cauliflower – xxXX       

T or D            40-50cm                  5-10days                      8-10weeks                          HF

Carrot – xxXX              

D                    4-7cm                      7-10days                      8-10weeks                          LF

Celery – ooxx             

T                     30-40cm                  10-18days                    12-14weeks                        HF

Cucumber – xxxx        

D                     40-50cm                  7-14days                      8-10weeks                         MF

Kale – xxxx                 

T or D             40-50cm                   5-10days                      6-8weeks                           HF

Leek – xxxx                

T                     10-15cm                   6-14days                      8-10weeks                          MF

Lettuce – xxXX           

T or D             25-35cm                   3-7days                         8-10weeks                         LF

Pea – XXXX               

D                     4-5cm                       5-10days                       8-10weeks                         LF

Peppers – ooo          

T                     30-40cm                   14-20days                     9-11weeks                         HF

Potato – XXXX           

D                     30-40cm                   –                                    11-14weeks                       MF

Radish – XXXX          

D                     3-8cm                        3-5days                         3-4weeks                           HF         

Spring onion – xxXX   

T                    4-8cm                        6-14days                       8-10weeks                         LF

Squash – xxx             

D                    80-100cm                  7-14days                       2-15weeks                          MF                

Swiss chard – xxXX   

T or D             25-35cm                    7-14days                       8-10weeks                          MF      

Tomato – oooo         

T                     40-50cm                    5-10days                       7-10weeks                          MF

Happy planting everyone – Spring is almost here!

Hashtag farmlife

Winter is alive.

The squelch of mud under your gumboots, the soft touch of rain on your face, the warmth of a fire in the evening. Dams filling up, rivers flowing, crisp winter greens.Bright copper kettles with warm woolen mittens. You get the idea.

Have you ever seen a sheep shake off rain like a dog does? Its brilliant. The sheep-shake is the new essence of winter for me. That and spinning wool by the fire. The smell of lanolin as I peddle barefoot. 2000 and what did you say?

We might be hippies but we like to think we are hip. We know about things like hashtags and pinterest and instagram.

Here are some photos of #farmlife #capepoint #goodhopegardens

Bee collecting pollen on an AloeBusy bee collecting pollen from an Aloe flower.

PeasWinter peas

Angulare tortoiseAngulare tortoise enjoying a little bit of sunshine.

Baboons ate the carrotsRaided by the baboons

PigsFeeding raided carrot tops to the pigs.

Happy carrotsBut not all of them were eaten. Happiness.

SheepShepherdesses

GoatThis goat. Always reaching for those goals.

Chilli seedsSeed saving – Chilli’s.

And of course, winter brings weeds. Weeds, weeds, weeds.

They have popped up all over our gardens, jostling for position in-between our flowers and veg. There is a cute saying that goes

Weeds – If you cant beat them, eat them.

Many weeds are edible, but you must be able to identify them correctly before attempting any wild weedy snacks as there are also many poisonous ones out there. Two good ones to start with would be Marog or Imfino – our local Lambsquarters and family of the Amaranth, and of course Urtica dioica the stinging Nettle.

Wild greens - marogo and nettle

Nettles are a mega nutrient high superfood. Its best to wear gloves when picking them and if you put them in a bowl and pour hot water over them, the stinging properties go away, leaving you to handle them freely. Marog comes in many different varieties, ranging from red through to dark green. You get a small grained, big leafed variety whose leaves you can use like spinach or a big grained, small leaf variety whose seeds can be used as a grain. Here is my Winter Greens soup recipe which include both of these weeds:

Winter Greens soup

INGREDIENTS:
1 tbs olive oil
2 onions with their greens, chopped
2 tbs chopped wild garlic leaves
2 cups of chopped spinach
2 cups of chopped nettles
2 cups of chopped marog leaves
a handful of white rice, amaranth or quinoa
1 litre of veg stock
Salt and pepper
Plain yoghurt or cream to drizzle over each bowl
METHOD:
Cook the onions and garlic over a medium heat until the onions are translucent. Add the rice, stir, cover with a lid and turn the heat down and cook for about 15 mins. Add the stock and the greens and cook for a further 15 mins. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve hot and drizzle the yoghurt or cream over each and garnish with a sprig of herbs.

Wild greens soup

You can enjoy this soup along with many other delicious wild food dishes at our Forage Harvest and Feast courses starting up again at the end of July.

FORAGE HARVEST FEAST
Fynbos Foraging Course
This half day course takes place in and around the Good Hope Gardens Nursery in Cape Point
Each course is different according to seasonality and availability in the gardens and the Fynbos. Explore the gardens, discover and pick edible floral foods and fresh organic vegetables. Learn about indigenous edibles, and how to utilize them in your kitchen, how to grow them in your garden and their medicinal properties. Notes and recipes on the plants that we use in the meal will be provided.
You will enjoy wild food snacks and drinks, a delicious meal shared by the group made from ingredients that we will forage and harvest along the way and end with a decadent wild desert, Fynbos tea and Buchu brandy.

Email roushanna@hotmail for more details.

Veggie Garden Club

Two weekends ago we had our very first Veggie Garden Club meeting here at Good Hope Gardens Nursery. The goal is to come together as growers from the area and to discuss ideas, problems we encounter in our gardens, share seeds and recipes. There are a lot of food producers locally as well as those who would like to learn, and I thought it would be great if we could get together and share knowledge and inspiration. We had a nice turnout for the first meeting, some people could not make it, but we filled the big wooden table in the Forage and Harvest classroom where the first meeting was held. The meetings will happen once a month at different gardens each time. Lucky for us, Kate Higgs – a fantastic photographer – joined our group and quietly took these beautiful photos.

There were a few things from the garden on the table for inspiration/to munch on.

Organic veg inspiration

Organic bananas

Rainbow radishes

Sweet potatoes

The group members varied from expert experienced permaculturists to those that had not yet started a veggie garden. Everyone had something interesting to contribute whether it was questions, answers, ideas, seeds or recipes.

Deep South Veggie Garden Club

Topics I had in mind that I wanted to cover were:

Crops, seeds, crop rotation and maintenance.

Topics that were discussed over the one and a half hours:

  • Baboons: Baboons are one of the biggest problem a food gardener faces in our area. We spoke about how to baboon proof your garden, what materials to use (check out your local dump) and how to build the structures like geodomes, cages and fencing.Deep South Veggie Garden Club
  • Veg planting guide: A Western Cape planting guide was handed around and we looked at what would work specifically in our area, what seeds we should be planting into the ground, what seedlings we should be planting and what to plant into trays. Deep South Veggie Garden Club
  • Hints and tips: The more experienced growers shared some hints and tips:
  1. Carrots and coriander need 8 days to germinate – after planting directly into the ground, cover with wet newspaper or hessian and keep moist for 7 days. On the 8th day, remove the cover and hope for a sunny day…..you will find the seeds have germinated and the weeds will have grown long, thin and white along the ground, searching for the sun. Once the cover is removed, the sun will scorch these white weeds, leaving you with only what you want in the bed.
  2. Wild rocket VS normal rocket – Wild rocket likes shade in late summer, it doesn’t get bitter, it self seeds easily and has smaller leaves. Normal rocket is a heavy feeder and would prefer to grow individually throughout your garden so scatter them around rather than plant a patch of them.
  3. The taste of herbs are diminished by the shade so rather plant in a sunny spot.
  4. For sweet carrots you need lots of minerals in the soil so add some phosphorus and potassium for tastier carrots.

Deep South Veggie Garden Club

  • We touched on seed saving, how to harvest seeds, how to store them and who had seeds to share.

Seed saving

  • Soil improvement – in our area the soil is very sandy. Sandy soil is good for drainage but needs to be enriched. We spoke about what to add to your soil. Get some horse manure from your local stables and mix with straw, Keep it wet and covered and spread over the sandy soil. Deep South Veggie Garden Club
  • MULCH MULCH MULCH. Watch Back to Eden for information on why mulch is so great for your garden. If you are not religious and can get past the biblical references, stick with it to watch and see how much sense the “forest floor” theory makes. Also invest/borrow or hire a wood chipper to chip up whole trees (branches and leaves included) or branches that need pruning in your garden. You can also get wood chips from your local dump or recycling center. Mulch should be about 10-15cm deep on your beds.Deep South Veggie Garden Club
  • We had a little talk and diagram drawn out for us by Pete explaining how wicking beds work. These container beds are about 120cm wide made from plastic containers or lined pallets. They have water and solid objects like rocks and bottles in the bottom layer, covered by biddem cloth. Next is a 30cm layer of compost followed by 6cm of wood chip. The is an inlet pipe that leads down to the water tank and feeds the plants through capillary action, so you don’t water the plants, just very occasionally top up the tank. Also an outlet pipe for overflow. Great for those with small gardens, or wanting to grow veg if you only have a courtyard or balcony. Pete makes these to order if you are not a great with tools.Wicking bed talk and diagram
  • We debated drip irrigation VS sprinkler/hose watering. Deep South Veggie Garden Club
  • Living near the Atlantic ocean we all have access to lots of seaweed. We spoke about using seaweed as a mulch or fertilizer. If you use undiluted seaweed your spinach can become more salty as a high content of salt in the soil will be absorbed by leafy greens.Deep South Veggie Garden Club
  • Hugelkultur was discussed and how we could/have implemented this in our own gardens. Deep South Veggie Garden Club
  • We shared recipes for leaves of the sweet potato and butternut. The first three shiny new leaves on a sweet potato vine can be used like spinach. Butternut and pumpkin leaves can be cooked with ground up raw peanuts in a coconut sauce and served on rice.Deep South Veggie Garden Club
  • A few of us had brought along some seeds to share – there was excitement and sparkling eyes as the seeds were passed around and we felt a bit like kids in a sweet shop.Radish seeds

What we should be planting now:

Seed Sowing Chart details by Franz Muhl.

Directly into the ground:

Beetroot. Final spacing: 8-12cm. Germination time: 7-14 days. Maturation time: 8-9weeks. Heavy feeder.

   Radishes. Final spacing: 3-8cm. Germination time: 3-5days. Maturation time: 3-4weeks. Heavy feeder.

Carrots: Final spacing: 4-7cm. Germination time: 7-10 days. Maturation time: 8-10weeks. Light feeder.

  Lettuce. Final spacing: 25-35cm. Germination time: 3-7days. Maturation time: 8-10weeks. Light feeder.

  Coriander. Final spacing: 1cm. Germination time: 7days. Maturation time: 3-5weeks. Medium feeder.

Garlic. Final spacing: 8-12cm. Heavy feeder.

Peas. Final spacing: 4-5cm. Germination time: 5-10days. Maturation time: 8-10weeks. Light feeder.

You can also direct seed turnips, nasturtiums, swiss chard and kale.

Into seed trays:

Onions. Final spacing: 10-15cm. Germination time: 6-14days. Medium feeder.

Spring onions. Final spacing: 4-8cm. Germination time: 6-14days. Maturation time: 8-10weeks. Light feeder.

Kale: Final spacing: 40-50cm. Germination time: 5-10days. Maturation time: 6-10weeks. Heavy feeder.

Swiss chard. Final spacing: 25-35cm. Germination time: 7-14days. Maturation time: 8-10weeks. Medium feeder.

You can also plant lettuce into trays.

Seedlings into the grounds:

Broccoli. Final spacing: 30-40cm. Germination time: 5-10days. Maturation time: 8-9weeks. Heavy feeder.

For organic seedling, Harts Nursery is a great place to buy from.

So maybe if you live in the Deep South you will be tempted to join us next month or if you dont live in the area, you will be motivated to start your own veggie garden club. As you know, food is kind of important to us humans – we should all learn how to grow our own and teach our children at the same time.

Happy planting and happy eating!

 

Tomato sauce recipe

For me, summer = tomatoes

There are so many different tomato varieties with such fun names, here are some examples:

Cherokee Purple, Lemon Boy, White Queen, Vintage Wine, Beefsteak, Green Grape, Black Russian, Yellow Stuffer.

Pretty cool. You can just imagine the colour variety.

We have been eating tomatoes all the time. As in every meal. With glut you need to get creative. Think out of the veggie box – Like in my Summer Glut post.

This time I am thinking very much In the Box. Or In the Bottle.

For my kids, tomatoes = tomato sauce, they dont really like the real thing. Which becomes a problem when your fridge is half full of them and so is your garden.

So I tried to make them a healthy version of the gloop they love so much. Are there any parents out there who have spent hours of effort in creating “delicious” healthy meals for your child only for it to be pushed aside or “Bleurgh!” to be declared after the first bite?

Yep. This was not one of those times. Success!

TOMATO SAUCE RECIPE

So first you have to put your tomatoes in boiling water for a few minutes. Then put them in cold water so they are easy to handle – now the skin is super easy to peel off.

Tomato sauce recipeTomato peels

Tomato sauce recipeYou can even peel with one hand and take photos with the other.

Tomato sauce recipePeeled toms.

Then you add HONEY (I used two tablespoons) HERBS (I used oregano and thyme, you can use anything including wild sage, caramalised onions and garlic, wild garlic or whatever your heart desires) SEA SALT (just a few crunches)

Blitz with a hand blender.

Bring to the boil and then simmer on a low heat for a few hours until the sauce has halved.

THE END

Tomato sauce recipeSo easy!

Quite delicious.

Tomato sauce recipeNot-so-fussy 1 year old eating homemade tomato sauce.

Tomato sauce recipe

Very fussy six year old boy eating homemade tomato sauce. That took hours. Miracles can happen!

Tomato sauce recipeThe grown up version on rice with basil and feta. Could work with anything – with pasta, pizza, as soup, on bread.

Goodbye Allgold. Hello kitchen. We have a winner.

Summer glut

The fragrant smell of sun warmed tomatoes is the true essence of summer to me. Watering rows of tomatoes and getting a hit of that fresh, clean smell conjures up images of cold salads, hot beaches and long hazy days.

To be honest with you, I’d rather bottle that smell over the tomatoes that would last us through winter. A whiff of summer memories versus tomato sauce…hmmm. Tough choice.

Am I the only person who would buy Eu de Tomato?

TomatoesApart from the daily colourful selection of tomatoes,

Gooseberriespackets of gooseberries

Red onionsand the occasional pram-full of onions

We have also have loads of marrows in various stages.

baby marrowsAs most veggie gardeners know, the sweet dainty marrows you get at the beginning of the season have a small window that quickly closes and they suddenly turn into uncontrollable monsters overnight with little taste, just waiting to surprise you from under their leaves early in the morning. “Haha!” you hear them cry as you spy new ones everywhere. “We are even bigger today! What will you do with us now?”

Marrows

You have to get creative. Always get creative, or your family will finally realize they are eating marrows for the fourth week running. After giving away armfuls to neighbours and friends, they eventually start avoiding you, having run out of marrow recipes. Guys, wait – don’t run so fast! There are so many, many recipes for involving marrows into almost all your meals, ranging from marrow bread to marrow chocolate brownies to stuffed marrow flowers. Here is our current favorite:

DOUBLE MARROW PASTA

This is a tasty, light, wheat free recipe. There are no quantities here, only suggestions, and you can add or omit any of the ingredients except the marrows. Obviously.

You can also shape the marrows to any pasta shape of your choice, even cut lasagna sheets out of the larger ones. They hold flavours very well so it works well as a pasta alternative and are great marinated raw.

Ingredients: Marrows, cheese, tomatoes, basil, avo, herbs, lashings of olive oil and crunches of sea salt

Peel the bigger marrows with a potato peeler until the seeds are showing. Top and tail the small ones and keep whole.

Double marrow pastaIn a pot of salted boiling water, pop the small whole marrows in. After 4 mins, add the marrow strips (the “pasta”) and remove from heat. Leave for one or two minutes, drain, toss with olive oil and sea salt and serve with the rest of the ingredients. Excellent with an icy glass of white wine/spring water with lemon/afternoon siesta.

Double marrow pasta

Scrumptious Summertime – Enjoy!

Kids Forage and Harvest Morning – Pizza!

Last Saturday we had such a fun laughter filled Kids Forage and Harvest morning!

Our lovely group of excited kids collected wild herbs, edible flowers and garden veg to create and eat PIZZA!

And yes, moms and dads, grannies and grandpa’s – they ate ALL THEIR VEG UP!!!

The mothers who were there were all very pleased with this and asked when the next one was…. It’s this coming Saturday the 9th of November!

Here are some highlights from our morning:

Kids foraging courseWere off!

Kids Foraging coursePicking carrots

Kids forage morningBella the pig!

Kids forage and Harvest morningChecking the goods

Farm animalsFarm animals!

Kids Forgae and Harvest morningRinsing the flowers

Carrot manMr Carrot Man

Kids Forage and HarvestCreating edible masterpieces

Kids forage and harvest courseYum!

Foraged and harvested pizzaSo tasty!

Kids forage and harvest morningSay cheese!

Hope you can join us at our next exciting morning 🙂