Tag: Recipies

Things I have made for the Tea Garden or simply something delicious for home.

Foraging with MasterChef SA

Episode 15 of MasterChef SA aired last week on MNET, and the top 5 contestants were told they had to forage for their main ingredients from the beach, Fynbos and forest floor.

It was such a great experience to meet them at Scarborough beach and take them to the inter tidal rock-pools to forage for mussels, periwinkles and edible seaweed and then on to Good Hope Gardens Nursery for a Fynbos forage for herbs and aromatic to compliment the harvested sea ingredients. The contestant were a charming, friendly and super enthusiastic group and I could see recipes running through their minds as they discovered a whole range of new flavours in the wild.

Foraging at Good Hope Gardens Nursery

Click on these video links to see more of what we got up to

Foraging with MasterChef SA

With the rising trend of foraging, concern for sustainable foraging is high, and with the fantastic platform of national television, I stressed this point as best I could.

Sustainable foraging

After foraging in the Deep South, they went to meet mushroom guru Gary Goldman in the forest and was guided by his passionate expertise and foraged some choice specimens.

Mushroom foraging with Gary

The contestants did well in the kitchen and created beautiful dishes with their foraged goods.

The top two recipes were Sipho’s Polenta lasagna filled with fried mushrooms and mussels and Roxi’s wild mushroom mille-feuille with hazelnut sauce.

Delicious! Heres hoping this post will inspire everyone to get creative and go wild.

Coastal Foraging

To find out more about our Fynbos and coastal foraging courses email roushanna@hotmail.com

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Tomato sauce recipe

For me, summer = tomatoes

There are so many different tomato varieties with such fun names, here are some examples:

Cherokee Purple, Lemon Boy, White Queen, Vintage Wine, Beefsteak, Green Grape, Black Russian, Yellow Stuffer.

Pretty cool. You can just imagine the colour variety.

We have been eating tomatoes all the time. As in every meal. With glut you need to get creative. Think out of the veggie box – Like in my Summer Glut post.

This time I am thinking very much In the Box. Or In the Bottle.

For my kids, tomatoes = tomato sauce, they dont really like the real thing. Which becomes a problem when your fridge is half full of them and so is your garden.

So I tried to make them a healthy version of the gloop they love so much. Are there any parents out there who have spent hours of effort in creating “delicious” healthy meals for your child only for it to be pushed aside or “Bleurgh!” to be declared after the first bite?

Yep. This was not one of those times. Success!

TOMATO SAUCE RECIPE

So first you have to put your tomatoes in boiling water for a few minutes. Then put them in cold water so they are easy to handle – now the skin is super easy to peel off.

Tomato sauce recipeTomato peels

Tomato sauce recipeYou can even peel with one hand and take photos with the other.

Tomato sauce recipePeeled toms.

Then you add HONEY (I used two tablespoons) HERBS (I used oregano and thyme, you can use anything including wild sage, caramalised onions and garlic, wild garlic or whatever your heart desires) SEA SALT (just a few crunches)

Blitz with a hand blender.

Bring to the boil and then simmer on a low heat for a few hours until the sauce has halved.

THE END

Tomato sauce recipeSo easy!

Quite delicious.

Tomato sauce recipeNot-so-fussy 1 year old eating homemade tomato sauce.

Tomato sauce recipe

Very fussy six year old boy eating homemade tomato sauce. That took hours. Miracles can happen!

Tomato sauce recipeThe grown up version on rice with basil and feta. Could work with anything – with pasta, pizza, as soup, on bread.

Goodbye Allgold. Hello kitchen. We have a winner.

Summer glut

The fragrant smell of sun warmed tomatoes is the true essence of summer to me. Watering rows of tomatoes and getting a hit of that fresh, clean smell conjures up images of cold salads, hot beaches and long hazy days.

To be honest with you, I’d rather bottle that smell over the tomatoes that would last us through winter. A whiff of summer memories versus tomato sauce…hmmm. Tough choice.

Am I the only person who would buy Eu de Tomato?

TomatoesApart from the daily colourful selection of tomatoes,

Gooseberriespackets of gooseberries

Red onionsand the occasional pram-full of onions

We have also have loads of marrows in various stages.

baby marrowsAs most veggie gardeners know, the sweet dainty marrows you get at the beginning of the season have a small window that quickly closes and they suddenly turn into uncontrollable monsters overnight with little taste, just waiting to surprise you from under their leaves early in the morning. “Haha!” you hear them cry as you spy new ones everywhere. “We are even bigger today! What will you do with us now?”

Marrows

You have to get creative. Always get creative, or your family will finally realize they are eating marrows for the fourth week running. After giving away armfuls to neighbours and friends, they eventually start avoiding you, having run out of marrow recipes. Guys, wait – don’t run so fast! There are so many, many recipes for involving marrows into almost all your meals, ranging from marrow bread to marrow chocolate brownies to stuffed marrow flowers. Here is our current favorite:

DOUBLE MARROW PASTA

This is a tasty, light, wheat free recipe. There are no quantities here, only suggestions, and you can add or omit any of the ingredients except the marrows. Obviously.

You can also shape the marrows to any pasta shape of your choice, even cut lasagna sheets out of the larger ones. They hold flavours very well so it works well as a pasta alternative and are great marinated raw.

Ingredients: Marrows, cheese, tomatoes, basil, avo, herbs, lashings of olive oil and crunches of sea salt

Peel the bigger marrows with a potato peeler until the seeds are showing. Top and tail the small ones and keep whole.

Double marrow pastaIn a pot of salted boiling water, pop the small whole marrows in. After 4 mins, add the marrow strips (the “pasta”) and remove from heat. Leave for one or two minutes, drain, toss with olive oil and sea salt and serve with the rest of the ingredients. Excellent with an icy glass of white wine/spring water with lemon/afternoon siesta.

Double marrow pasta

Scrumptious Summertime – Enjoy!

Seaweed

We are loving seaweed at the moment. Collecting it (sustainably of course) for our animals, gardens, food and for beauty treatments!

Coastal foraging

While it is fun and exhilarating to be foraging for your own free seaweed and mussels that are growing so prolifically at our beautiful beaches, it is important to remember a few rules. In all the excitement of foraging edible seaweed, it can be subject to over harvesting – especially in a focused area which could quickly be depleted:

  1. Always be sure the sea you are collecting from is not polluted and there is no red tide when collecting mussels.

  2. Collect at the low tide, closest to the tide line as possible.

  3. Never pull seaweed off a rock, rather cut pieces off with a pair of scissors leaving its “holdfast” attached to the rock so that the rest of the plant may regrow.

  4. Only cut 1/3 of the seaweed.

  5. Only pick seaweed for culinary use that is attached to a rock, don’t collect any you find floating or washed up on shore.

  6. Only pick seaweeds that look healthy and clean.

  7. Only pick what you need!

  8. Don t collect any unusual seaweed that is sparse in the rock pools, only what you see growing prolifically in the area.

  9. Watch your back! Never have your back turned to the waves as you collect, especially when collecting those elusive big mussels clinging to the rocks on the low tide line. On a stormy day, one wave can easily sweep you out to sea.

  10. Only collect what your permit allows.

  11. Respect all wild life when you forage. Take care where you walk.

  12. Sustainable harvesting ensures regrowth, conservation and abundance for animals, sea life and for yourselves for the next season.

For a great overview on seaweed written by Rob Anderson, please read here.

For info on the three different kinds of seaweeds – brown, red and green – please click on this:

3G Algae (Seaweed & Phytoplankton)

Sea lettuce

Visit this link on the Scenic South website for my Sea Biscuit recipe using Sea Lettuce or Ulva (shown above).

Kelp saladKELP AND AVO SALAD

Ingredients:

3 kelp blades, your choice of oil for frying, 1t tbs sesame seeds, 3 avocados, salt and pepper to taste, half a lemon.

Method:

Cut strips of kelp and quick fry in a hot pan until they turn green. Take them out and put them on paper towel to drain. Put them in a salad bowl and shake over the sesame seeds. Toss until coated. Chop up the avo and add to the bowl. Squeeze in the lemon juice and season to taste. Decorate with edible flowers. Great as a sandwich filler!

Enjoy! And if you have any tasty seaweed recipes, please do share with us!

Seaweed salad recipe

The other day I wrote about collecting seaweed in my wild mushroom post that we were going to put in a marinade for salad. I thought I would share the recipe with you today as it turned out to be so delicious (modest).

There are three types of seaweed and these are classified by colour: Red, Green and Brown. In this recipe I used green “sea lettuce” seaweed collected of the rocks at low tide. Cut pieces of seaweed off with scissors rather than tearing the whole plant off the rock so that it can continue to grow. You can collect all year round except when there is a red tide, but the very best time for collecting seaweed is in Spring as it is highest in nutrients then.

SEAWEED SALAD WITH GARDEN GREENS AND EDIBLE FLOWERS

Ingredients:

For the seaweed marinade: 2 cups of seaweed, 1 tbs honey, 1 tbs soy sauce, salt and pepper to taste, 2 tbs sesame seeds (optional).

For the salad: Fresh garden greens, edible flowers, ready-cooked whole wheat couscous. *

First rinse your seaweed well in a basin of cold water, rubbing to dislodge any little shells and pieces of sand stuck to the leaves.

Then put them in a bowl and pour over hot water. Leave for 5 mins and drain.

Put the seaweed, honey, soy sauce, salt, pepper and sesame seeds in a bowl. Mix and refrigerate for a few hours or overnight.

For making your salad, simply add your garden greens and couscous to the seaweed, toss, sprinkle a couple of edible flowers on top and hey presto – a restaurant quality meal with double the taste yet way more affordable!

*You can add any veg to this salad – carrots, cucumber and radish work well and you can even add fresh sashimi fish for a sushi-type salad. Enjoy!

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Forage, Feast and Garden Tours

Good Hope Gardens

Fynbos Flavours

Forage, Feast and Garden Tours

This half day course takes place in and around the Good Hope Gardens Nursery in Cape Point run by Roushanna and Gael Gray on weekends and can accommodate 12 people. A minimum group of 8 is required.

Group bookings can be arranged on request in the week. Corporate bookings for up to 20 people via special arrangement. Starting time for the course is 10am. To book please contact roushanna@hotmail.com

Cost

The half day course includes pre-prepared wild food snacks and drinks tasted along the walk, a simple delicious meal shared by the group that we will forage along the way and a pre-prepared wild desert. You will also receive information sheets and recipes on the plants that we will use in the meal.

R500 per person or R1800 for group of 4 friends.

Alternatively you can book a Wild Food Meal and sit down and enjoy a Wild Food tasting lunch at your leisure (minimum of 10 per group)

What to expect

Each course is different according to seasonality and availability in the gardens and the bush. Explore our gardens, discover and pick edible floral foods and fresh organic vegetables. Learn about indigenous edibles, and how to utilize them in your kitchen, how to grow them in your garden and their medicinal properties. After the snacks and tour we will get creative and prepare and share a meal. This will be followed by questions and answers. You can also enjoy a 10% discount in the nursery retail should you wish to purchase any indigenous plants for your garden.

What to bring

Gumboots or comfortable walking shoes, raincoat/sun hat – suitable outdoor gear. Cameras are welcome. Don’t forget an open mind and your sense of humor!

Other courses and walks we offer:

Coastal Foraging

Kids Forage Harvest and Feast

Educational Fynbos walks

Guided fynbos walks

 

Visit This Post for an introduction to your guides!

Sun tea Stuffed squash flowers, purple carrots and wild garlic  Patty pans IMG_20130426_113018

Great article and wild food recipes

This week we had a lovely write up in our local newspaper about our foraging, feasting and garden tours in The Falsebay Echo:

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Included in the article were two of my wild food recipes: Wild Asparagus Quiche and Wild Syrups which I will share with you below.

Quick and Easy Wild Asparagus Quiche

Pastry:

100g flour, 100g butter, 100g grated cheddar cheese.

Filling:

2 cups of washed wild asparagus tips, half a cup of spekboom (Portulacaria afra) leaves, one young onion diced, 3 free range eggs, 50g smooth cottage cheese, 60g feta cheese, half a cup of milk, a tbs of cornflour, half a tsp of baking powder, one tbs butter for frying.

Method:

Rub the flour, butter and cheese together until a dough is formed and press evenly into a greased pie dish.

Fry the onions in the butter until translucent and then add the spekboom and asparagus and stir fry for five minutes.

Remove from heat and let it cool. In a bowl, whisk the remaining ingredients together and pour over the uncooked pastry shell. Carefully spoon the asparagus mix equally over the egg mix and bake in a preheated oven at  180 degrees until golden brown, about half an hour.

Wild Syrups

Ingredients:

1cup of scented leaves – for example Peppermint Pelargonium, Rose Pelargonium or Wild mint leaves – washed and patted dry with a dish towel. Half a cup of sugar. One cup of water.

Method:

Place all the ingredients in a saucepan and simmer over a low heat. Cook until sugar has dissolved – this takes about 15mins, stirring occasionally. Strain through a sieve, squeezing the last of the syrup out of the leaves against the sieve with a spoon. Decant into sterilized bottles. Enjoy over ice cream, yoghurt, as a cordial or in a cocktail!

Peppermint Pelargonium syrup