Tag: wild garlic

Wild Food Tapas at The Cape Farmhouse

WILD FOOD TAPAS AT THE CAPE FARMHOUSE

Friday the 17th of July
Don’t miss out on this exciting edible adventure so deliciously fresh and local – these new flavour sensations promise to drive your taste buds WILD!

Chef Phil Mansergh and Roushanna Gray from Good Hope Gardens Nursery will be collaborating on this Wild Food Tapas night, combining their skills and creativity, preparing beautiful tapas dishes, each with an indigenous edible ingredient, sustainably harvested and paired to perfection.

MENU:
Locally baked wild pine ring mushroom artisan break bread served with wild fennel seed butter

Beach broth with foraged seaweed 

Cream of wild asparagus (veldkoel) soup

Wild spinach and paneer samoosas

Local goats cheese with mixed heirloom greens salad, caramelised oranges and Fynbos infused dressing

Organic potato wedges served with wild garlic and Oxalis aoli and a sweet chilli and sourfig sauce.

Kelp Sushi rolls

Hottentot fish cakes with spekboom mayo

Pork and seaweed sausages with wild berry (Num Num) jam 

Rose Pelargonium chocolate brownies with Catawba coulis and cream

Please book to avoid disappointment – phone 021 780 1246 or email info@capefarmhouse.com

CapeFarmhouse

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Wild Food catering

This weekend I made local wild food tasters for some Japanese seaweed scientists.

No pressure.

Wild cocktails

Wild mint and buchu brandy cocktails

Wild food startersBuchu brandy is excellent for settling the stomach. So after a heavy meal a shot of this would do you good….nice excuse!

Wild food seashoreCrumbed black mussels on a bed of wild nori

Limpet and periwinkle samoosasShe sells sea shells on the sea shore…

Wild food cateringLimpet, periwinkle and “krimpvarkie” seaweed samoosas

Sour figsPerfectly ripe, rainbow coloured sour figs

Ulva chilli bitesUlva seaweed and wild sage chillibites

Seaweed coleslawBrassicophycus and Chordariopsus seaweed coleslaw salad with edible wild flowers.

Wild garlic rollsNever-fail wild garlic rolls

Wild food dessertAnd for something sweet….

Agar-agar mini milk-tart “boats” with candied kelp and Carissa flowers.

Hope this keeps you inspired – Have a totally wild week!

Wild food supper

We recently had some friends in the field (pun intended) over for a wild food supper.

I thought I’d share with you some of the dishes we ate.

But first the prep. Gathering ingredients for wild foods is fun and adventurous and sometimes a little crazy.

Like surfing for our seaweed, or in this case, climbing up a ladder to collect the dried Strelitzia nicolai flowers towering overhead. You can eat the fresh seeds raw and the dried ones can be ground up and used as a flour. Just remember to leave more than you collect.

Strelitzia nicolaiStrelitzia nicolia dried flowers heads

Then you have to brave the bugs and spiders to find the beautiful golden fynbos pirate treasure inside the very hard seed pods.

Strelitzia seedsStrelitzia n. seeds

The seeds are like little hard black coffee beans with a white inside that can be ground up. The gorgeous orange fluff attached to them is the aril that is also edible. It’s a lot of work for a small amount of flour, but a labour of love is usually delicious!

wild food dessertAgar agar and strawberry brule w. Carissa macrocarpa flower and Strilitzia shortcake

Pictured above on the left you can see the final product…I used the flour to make a shortcake and included the aril for added edible decoration.

So now I will backtrack to the starters. Sorry. Its like reading one of those books that the beginning is in the middle and you start at the end and finish in the future. Confusing and edgy. Exciting and wonderful –  like these sweet and salty seaweed nutsSeaweed nuts

This a super easy, highly tasty snack to make. Whether you are hosting a Rugby Watching Braai or a Canape and Cocktail Soiree, these will go down a treat.

Using freshly washed and rinsed sea lettuce or Ulva, chop up a cup full and toss with assorted nuts. season with sea salt and sugar and pop in the oven on a low heat until the nuts are golden brown and the seaweed is crispy.

Yum.

We also enjoyed oven baked periwinkle and seaweed samoosas

Periwinkle samoosas

Periwinkle samoosasPeriwinkle and seaweed samoosas

Seaweed couscous salad – get the recipe here.

Couscous seaweed saladUlva couscous salad with wild garlic flowers

Never-fail-to-please ruby relish on Bree

Carissa and beetroot relish on breeCarissa macrocarpa berry and beetroot relish topped with Carissa bispinosa berries.

Wild garlic rolls and farm butter

Tulbaghia rollsTulbaghia violacea rolls

These were used to mop up the exquisite juices of the mussels….

Musssels and spekboomMussels in a creamy white wine sauce with garlic, thyme, Salvia chamelaeagnea, Portulacaria afra and whole baby onions.

For dips we had Morogo, Wild garlic and King Protea seed pesto and a Wild sage sour cream

Morogo pesto and salvia sour creamMorogo, Tulbaghia violacea and Protea cyneriodes seed pesto. Sheeps milk sour-cream flavoured with Salvia dentata.

We hope this inspires you to be creative and adventurous with your cooking this year –

Happy 2014!

 

Red ribbon seaweed

For one of the desserts at our Coastal Foraging, I make an agar agar jelly treat. To do this you have to collect the red ribbon seaweed that grows on kelp fronds and boil it to extract the agar agar.

Coastal foragingAgar agar kiwi jelly and candied kelp on ice cream.

The romantic version of collecting the seaweed is on a beautiful summers day..blue skies and turquoise sea. A surfboard, a smile and a skip down the beach.

The reality is usually more like a sand-blasted walk down the beach through a howling south-easter, slipping on the porphyra strewn rocks to get to the water’s edge at low tide, holding on with your toes and getting soaked by waves trying to reach the kelp.

If you try and have a surf you could easily get smacked if the face with your board like I did today. Who needs botox right? Dear wind, please hit my lip on the other side now. Angelina Jolie roll over – this is a Deep South extreme makeover.

And if you have missed low tide, you better start looking for a limpet with a lot of red seaweed growing on its shell.

Coastal foraginglike this but more.

Today we got the romantic version….

Coastal foragingA surfboard, a smile and a skip down the beach

Coastal foragingOk and maybe one quick little wave. Or five…

Coastal foragingCollecting the seaweed.

Coastal foragingFound a good bunch! Tough job hey. Gotta love these board meetings.

Coastal foragingWoohoo! Dreamy Summertime.

Coastal foragingLets go check out the haul…

Coastal foragingNeatly stashed away in wetsuit and top

Coastal foragingThe foraged goods. Nice.

A little bit of everything here – red, brown and green seaweed to eat.

Watch out for our next blog post to see what we made…

Happy holidays!

Edible flowers

Its an overcast, rainy day outside.

Image

There are low clouds sweeping across the Fynbos Walk. At night we are still lighting fires, sleeping with extra blankets and wearing layers in the day.

But the garden is convinced that Spring is here!

Here are some of the edible flowers in bloom in our gardens:

CornflowersMulti-coloured Cornflowers

CornflowerCornflower

NasturtiumNasturtium

CorianderCoriander

PoppyPoppy

Radish Radish

BorageBorage

PelargoniumPelargonium

Perenial basilPerennial Basil

CalendulaCalendula

ThymeThyme

TulbaghiaWild garlic

PeaPea

RocketRocket

Rainbow salad recipes are on my mind. Do any of you have a great flower recipe you wouldn’t mind sharing?

Happy Spring!

Spring Forage and Harvest course

On a freezing cold and drizzly Saturday morning, our wild food enthusiast group set off on a Forage and Harvest garden tour.

We looked, picked and dug, touched, smelt and tasted, prepared, cooked and ate indigenous edibles, organic veggies, floral foods, wild herbs and weeds.

Everyone walked away with new plant knowledge, recipes, notes, a packet of seeds, new friends, a full belly and a smile on their face.

Here are a few of the many beautiful images that Juliette de Combes took on the day:

Image

Wild garlic

Gumboots required!

In the veggie garden

Borage

Cornflowers

Pelargonium flowers

Snacks

Kapokbos

Nettle

Fennel

Prepping

Wild garlic roll

Cooking

Relish on Bree

Nettle and spinach soup

Feast!

Thank you to all the wild food enthusiasts in the group!

 Lets do it again sometime – new season, new ingredients.

If you want in on the fun, contact us

and discover local wild food.

Foraging and harvesting in the gardens

This post is dedicated to Tai, Thandi, Jack and Rubi

School holidays are viewed with mixed joy and dread. There is the joy of no dark, cold, early morning lunchbox hunts and school runs but with it brings the dread of how to keep such keen little minds entertained the whole day! We kicked off our holiday with a Fynbos Flavour walk and garden tour at the nursery, picking and discovering new smells and tastes and textures. And, of course – getting dirty and eating lots of delicious food. The kids loved every second!

The Fynbos and veg forage and harvest begins….

Picking PelargoniumPicking Pelargonium leaves. The different scented leaves of the Pelargoniums are heavenly in iced teas and baking.

Mentha longifoliaMinty fresh! Indigenous Mentha longifolia.

Wild JasmineSmelling the sweetly perfumed scent of a wild Jasmine flower.

Carissa bushLooking for ripe Num Num or Carissa berries. The white milk that you see when you pick these berries are non toxic. The fruit is delicious and attracts birds and butterflies but this clever bush protects its berries with big spiky thorns.

Sour figSour figs or Carpobrotus edulis. This an amazing all-rounder. It provides snacks, medicine and is a super easy water-wise plant to grow! The tortoises love eating these succulent fleshy leaves.

ChrysanthemoidesSearching for some ripe Tick Berries. The Crysanthemoides monilifera is much loved by the birds and they have usually eaten all the ripe berries before we can find any! “monilifera” means “bearing a necklace” in Latin, referring to its cluster of berries. The berries are green until they ripen, turning into plump juicy black berries that look just like fat ticks.

Portulacaria afraTasting some spekboom leaves. The Portulacaria afra is a fascinating plant. The sharp tart flavoured leaves are edible and are a great addition added raw to salads or fried with a bit of butter and seasoning. It has many medicinal properties including the traditional use of increasing milk production in breastfeeding moms. Elephants love this juicy plant and its a great carbon absorber. It also soaks up the suns harmful rays, creating a happy healthy enviroment for animals and insects to live under.

Kai appleLucky us – there was a Dovyalis caffra with an abundance of its tasty fruit spilling over just waiting to be foraged. Dovyalis means Spear in Greek, and there are long sharp thorns protecting the fruit in these trees. Six nimble fingered hands soon got the hang of extracting the fruit though!

Kai applesThe old kai apples on the ground were declared perfect for magic potions.

Salad greensWe collected some salad greens from the veggie gardens. Coriander, different types of lettuce, spinach, baby beetroot tops, celery, fennel fronds, and edible flowers.

RadishesFat juicy radishes!

Tulbaghia violaceaWe dug for some wild garlic roots. This was quite an established patch, so we had to dig hard and carefully separate some of these roots to be scrubbed well and baked in the oven. As soon as the long leaves are bruised it gives of a strong garlic aroma. Throughout summer, these plants have beautiful violet flowers that can be added to salads and especially delicious in potato salad.

Purple carrotsWe found some crazy purple carrots! These have an amazing nutty taste, nothing like the tasteless orange carrots you find in the supermarkets. Best eaten raw, seconds after picking them and washing them off.

HarvestFood glorious food!

Rinsing the foodRinsing off the leaves and flowers.

Lavender and PelargoniumThe secret ingredients for the scones!

Making the sconesRolling and shaping and adding the petals and leaves to the scones.

Golden sugar-free flower sconesThis golden one is mine!

Fresh rainbow saladFresh rainbow salad – who could resist?

Carissa and Kai apple jam on flower sconesAnyone for a bite of Kai apple and Num num jam on warm buttered flower scones?

A foraged feast!After a morning of hard work, we sat down to a well deserved freshly foraged meal. Delicious!

Lunch time!All our foraged and harvested Fynbos Flavour walks are different, depending on whats growing in the gardens at the time of your visit.

Who knows what next seasons menu will bring…

Hope you will be at the table!